Achaean

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 21 Sep 2011 12:45 and updated at 21 Sep 2011 12:45

ILIAD NOUN

ild.01 "Of a truth," he said, "a great sorrow has befallen the Achaean land.
ild.02 It will be a sorry tale hereafter that an Achaean host, at once so great and valiant, battled in vain against men fewer in number than themselves; but as yet the end is not in sight.
ild.02 Would you have yet more Gold, which some Trojan is to give you as a ransom for his son, when I or another Achaean has taken him prisoner? or is it some young girl to hide and lie with? It is not well that you, the ruler of the Achaeans, should bring them into such misery.
ild.02 The men of Argos, again, and those who held the walls of Tiryns, with Hermione, and Asine upon the gulf; Troezene, Eionae, and the vineyard lands of Epidaurus; the Achaean youths, moreover, who came from Aegina and Mases; these were led by Diomed of the loud battle cry, and Sthenelus son of famed Capaneus.
ild.03 The attendants brought on the oath offerings and mixed the wine in the mixing bowls; they poured water over the hands of the chieftains, and the son of Atreus drew the dagger that hung by his sword, and cut wool from the lambs heads; this the men servants gave about among the Trojan and Achaean princes, and the son of Atreus lifted up his hands in prayer.
ild.04 The sire of Gods and men heeded her words, and said to Minerva, "Go at once into the Trojan and Achaean hosts, and contrive that the Trojans shall be the first to break their oaths and set upon the Achaeans.
ild.05 I say further, and lay my saying to your heart if Minerva sees fit to vouchsafe me the glory of killing both, stay your Horses here and make the reins fast to the rim of the Chariot; then be sure you spring Aeneas Horses and drive them from the Trojan to the Achaean ranks.
ild.05 Then he sprang upon Aeneas s Horses and drove them from the Trojan to the Achaean ranks.
ild.05 Father" Jove," said she, "do not be angry with me, but I think the Cyprian must have been persuading some one of the Achaean Women to go with the Trojans of whom she is so very fond, and while caressing one or other of them she must have torn her delicate hand with the Gold pin of the Woman s brooch.
ild.07 Then Nestor rose and spoke, "Of a truth," said he, "the Achaean land is fallen upon evil times.
ild.07 Son" of Atreus," he said, "and princes of the Achaean host, Priam and the other noble Trojans have sent me to tell you the saying of Alexandrus through whom this quarrel has come about, if so be that you may find it acceptable.
ild.09 Then, when we reach Achaean Argos, wealthiest of all lands, he shall be my son in law and I will show him like honour with my own dear son Orestes, who is being nurtured in all abundance.
ild.09 Then, when we reach Achaean Argos, wealthiest of all lands, you shall be his son in law, and he will show you like honour with his own dear son Orestes, who is being nurtured in all abundance.
ild.09 If the Gods spare me to return home, Peleus will find me a wife; there are Achaean Women in Hellas and Phthia, daughters of kings that have cities under them; of these I can take whom I will and marry her.
ild.10 And Agamemnon answered, Nestor", son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, it is I, Agamemnon son of Atreus, on whom Jove has laid labour and sorrow so long as there is breath in my body and my limbs carry me.
ild.10 He buckled on his purple coat, of two thicknesses, large, and of a rough shaggy texture, grasped his redoubtable Bronze shod spear, and wended his way along the line of the Achaean ships.
ild.10 And Ulysses answered, Nestor" son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, heaven, if it so will, can give us even better Horses than these, for the Gods are far mightier than we are.
ild.11 The Achaeans were in great fear that as the fight had turned against them the Trojans might take him prisoner, and Idomeneus said to Nestor, Nestor" son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, mount your Chariot at once; take Machaon with you and drive your Horses to the ships as fast as you can.
ild.13 Jove was minded to give victory to the Trojans and to Hector, so as to do honour to fleet Achilles, nevertheless he did not mean to utterly overthrow the Achaean host before Ilius, and only wanted to glorify Thetis and her valiant son.
ild.13 Helenus then struck Deipyrus with a great Thracian sword, hitting him on the temple in close combat and tearing the helmet from his head; the helmet fell to the ground, and one of those who were fighting on the Achaean side took charge of it as it rolled at his feet, but the eyes of Deipyrus were closed in the darkness of death.
ild.13 When they heard his voice they all hastened to gather round Polydamas the excellent son of Panthous, but Hector kept on among the foremost, looking everywhere to find Deiphobus and prince Helenus, Adamas son of Asius, and Asius son of Hyrtacus; living, indeed, and scatheless he could no longer find them, for the two last were lying by the sterns of the Achaean ships, slain by the Argives, while the others had been also stricken and wounded by them; but upon the left wing of the dread battle he found Alexandrus, husband of lovely Helen, cheering his men and urging them on to fight.
ild.14 Then King Agamemnon said to him, Nestor" son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, why have you left the battle to come hither? I fear that what dread Hector said will come true, when he vaunted among the Trojans saying that he would not return to Ilius till he had fired our ships and killed us; this is what he said, and now it is all coming true.
ild.15 If, then, you are speaking the truth and mean what you say, go among the rank and file of the Gods, and tell Iris and Apollo lord of the bow, that I want them Iris, that she may go to the Achaean host and tell Neptune to leave off fighting and go home, and Apollo, that he may send Hector again into battle and give him fresh strength; he will thus forget his present sufferings, and drive the Achaeans back in confusion till they fall among the ships of Achilles son of Peleus.
ild.15 Take, then, your tasselled aegis, and shake it furiously, so as to set the Achaean heroes in a panic; take, moreover, brave Hector, O Far Darter, into your own care, and rouse him to deeds of daring, till the Achaeans are sent flying back to their ships and to the Hellespont.
ild.15 The Achaeans stood firm and resisted the attack of the Trojans, yet though these were fewer in number, they could not drive them back from the ships, neither could the Trojans break the Achaean ranks and make their way in among the tents and ships.
ild.15 You would have thought the men were coming on fresh and unwearied, so fiercely did they fight; and this was the mind in which they were the Achaeans did not believe they should escape destruction but thought themselves doomed, while there was not a Trojan but his heart beat high with the hope of firing the ships and putting the Achaean heroes to the sword.
ild.17 As a flock of daws or starlings fall to screaming and chattering when they see a falcon, foe to i ll small birds, come soaring near them, even so did the Achaean youth raise a babel of cries as they fled before Aeneas and Hector, unmindful of their former prowess.
ild.19 Call, therefore, the Achaean heroes in assembly; unsay your anger against Agamemnon; arm at once, and fight with might and main.
ild.19 Then Achilles went out upon the seashore, and with a loud cry called on the Achaean heroes.
ild.19 For so, many an Achaean the less would have bitten dust before the foe in the days of my anger.
ild.19 For Juno darted down from the high summit of Olympus, and went in haste to Achaean Argos where she knew that the noble wife of Sthenelus son of Perseus then was.
ild.22 Achilles made signs to the Achaean host, and shook his head to show that no man was to aim a dart at Hector, lest another might win the glory of having hit him and he might himself come in second.
ild.22 Now, therefore, Achaean youths, let us raise the song of victory and go back to the ships taking this man along with us; for we have achieved a mighty triumph and have slain noble Hector to whom the Trojans prayed throughout their city as though he were a God.
ild.24 Or, may be, some Achaean will hurl you (O miserable death) from our walls, to avenge some brother, son, or father whom Hector slew; many of them have indeed bitten the dust at his hands, for your father s hand in battle was no light one.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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