Apollo

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 21 Sep 2011 13:11 and updated at 21 Sep 2011 13:11

ILIAD NOUN

ild.01 Now Chryses had come to the ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, and had brought with him a great ransom: moreover he bore in his hand the sceptre of Apollo wreathed with a suppliant s wreath and he besought the Achaeans, but most of all the two sons of Atreus, who were their chiefs.
ild.01 Sons" of Atreus," he cried, "and all other Achaeans, may the Gods who dwell in Olympus grant you to sack the city of Priam, and to reach your homes in safety; but free my daughter, and accept a ransom for her, in reverence to Apollo, son of Jove.
ild.01 Not a word he spoke, but went by the shore of the sounding sea and prayed apart to King Apollo whom lovely Leto had borne.
ild.01 Thus did he pray, and Apollo heard his prayer.
ild.01 Let us ask some priest or prophet, or some reader of dreams (for dreams, too, are of Jove) who can tell us why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, and say whether it is for some vow that we have broken, or Hecatomb that we have not offered, and whether he will accept the savour of lambs and Goats without blemish, so as to take away the plague from us.
ild.01 He it was who had guided the Achaeans with their fleet to Ilius, through the prophesyings with which Phoebus Apollo had inspired him.
ild.01 Achilles", loved of heaven, you bid me tell you about the anger of King Apollo, I will therefore do so; but consider first and swear that you will stand by me heartily in word and deed, for I know that I shall offend one who rules the Argives with might, to whom all the Achaeans are in subjection.
ild.01 And Achilles answered, "Fear not, but speak as it is borne in upon you from heaven, for by Apollo, Calchas, to whom you pray, and whose oracles you reveal to us, not a Danaan at our ships shall lay his hand upon you, while I yet live to look upon the face of the earth no, not though you name Agamemnon himself, who is by far the foremost of the Achaeans.
ild.01 You have brought me neither comfort nor performance; and now you come seeing among Danaans, and saying that Apollo has plagued us because I would not take a ransom for this girl, the daughter of Chryses.
ild.01 I care neither for you nor for your anger; and thus will I do: since Phoebus Apollo is taking Chryseis from me, I shall send her with my ship and my followers, but I shall come to your tent and take your own prize Briseis, that you may learn how much stronger I am than you are, and that another may fear to set himself up as equal or comparable with me.
ild.01 The sons of the Achaeans shared it duly among themselves, and chose lovely Chryseis as the meed of Agamemnon; but Chryses, priest of Apollo, came to the ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, and brought with him a great ransom: moreover he bore in his hand the sceptre of Apollo, wreathed with a suppliant s wreath, and he besought the Achaeans, but most of all the two sons of Atreus who were their chiefs.
ild.01 So he went back in anger, and Apollo, who loved him dearly, heard his prayer.
ild.01 At last a seer in the fulness of his knowledge declared to us the oracles of Apollo, and I was myself first to say that we should appease him.
ild.01 They then got out upon the sea shore and landed the Hecatomb for Apollo; Chryseis also left the ship, and Ulysses led her to the altar to deliver her into the hands of her father.
ild.01 Chryses"," said he, King" Agamemnon has sent me to bring you back your child, and to offer sacrifice to Apollo on behalf of the Danaans, that we may propitiate the God, who has now brought sorrow upon the Argives.
ild.01 Thus did he pray, and Apollo heard his prayer.
ild.01 Apollo sent them a fair wind, so they raised their mast and hoisted their white sails aloft.
ild.01 Apollo struck his lyre, and the Muses lifted up their sweet voices, calling and answering one another.
ild.02 Would, by Father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo, that I had among them Ten more such councillors, for the city of King Priam would then soon fall beneath our hands, and we should sack it.
ild.02 Apollo, of the Silver bow, had bred them in Perea both of them mares, and terrible as Mars in battle.
ild.02 Ida, men of substance, who drink the limpid waters of the Aesepus, and are of Trojan blood these were led by Pandarus son of Lycaon, whom Apollo had taught to use the bow.
ild.04 Take your home aim then, and pray to Lycian Apollo, the famous archer; vow that when you get home to your strong city of Zelea you will offer a Hecatomb of firstling lambs in his honour.
ild.04 He laid the arrow on the string and prayed to Lycian Apollo, the famous archer, vowing that when he got home to his strong city of Zelea he would offer a Hecatomb of firstling lambs in his honour.
ild.04 Would, by father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo that all were so minded as you are, for the city of Priam would then soon fall beneath our hands, and we should sack it.
ild.04 But Apollo looked down from Pergamus and called aloud to the Trojans, for he was displeased.
ild.05 On this the son of Lycaon shouted in triumph, Knights" Trojans, come on; the bravest of the Achaeans is wounded, and he will not hold out much longer if King Apollo was indeed with me when I sped from Lycia hither.
ild.05 Venus screamed aloud, and let her son fall, but Phoebus Apollo caught him in his arms, and hid him in a cloud of darkness, lest some Danaan should drive a spear into his breast and kill him; and Diomed shouted out as he left her, Daughter" of Jove, leave war and battle alone, can you not be contented with beguiling silly Women? If you meddle with fighting you will get what will make you shudder at the very name of war.
ild.05 But Diomed sprang upon Aeneas, though he knew him to be in the very arms of Apollo.
ild.05 Thrice did he spring forward with might and main to slay him, and thrice did Apollo beat back his gleaming shield.
ild.05 When he was coming on for the fourth time, as though he were a God, Apollo shouted to him with an awful voice and said, "Take heed, son of Tydeus, and draw off; think not to match yourself against Gods, for men that walk the earth cannot hold their own with the immortals.
ild.05 The son of Tydeus then gave way for a little space, to avoid the anger of the God, while Apollo took Aeneas out of the crowd and set him in sacred Pergamus, where his temple stood.
ild.05 There, within the mighty sanctuary, Latona and Diana healed him and made him glorious to behold, while Apollo of the Silver bow fashioned a wraith in the likeness of Aeneas, and armed as he was.
ild.05 Then Phoebus Apollo said to Mars, Mars", Mars, bane of men, blood stained stormer of cities, can you not go to this man, the son of Tydeus, who would now fight even with father Jove, and draw him out of the battle? He first went up to the Cyprian and wounded her in the hand near her wrist, and afterwards sprang upon me too, as though he were a God.
ild.05 Fierce Mars, to help the Trojans, covered them in a veil of darkness, and went about everywhere among them, inasmuch as Phoebus Apollo had told him that when he saw Pallas, Minerva leave the fray he was to put courage into the hearts of the Trojans for it was she who was helping the Danaans.
ild.05 Then Apollo sent Aeneas forth from his rich sanctuary, and filled his heart with valour, whereon he took his place among his comrades, who were overjoyed at seeing him alive, sound, and of a good courage; but they could not ask him how it had all happened, for they were too busy with the turmoil raised by Mars and by Strife, who raged insatiably in their midst.
ild.05 Father" Jove," said she, "are you not angry with Mars for these high doings? how great and goodly a host of the Achaeans he has destroyed to my great grief, and without either right or reason, while the Cyprian and Apollo are enjoying it all at their ease and setting this unrighteous madman on to do further mischief.
ild.07 When, therefore, Minerva saw these men making havoc of the Argives, she darted down to Ilius from the summits of Olympus, and Apollo, who was looking on from Pergamus, went out to meet her; for he wanted the Trojans to be victorious.
ild.07 The pair met by the oak tree, and King Apollo son of Jove was first to speak.
ild.07 Apollo, son of Jove, replied, "Let us incite great Hector to challenge some one of the Danaans in single combat; on this the Achaeans will be shamed into finding a man who will fight him.
ild.07 But Minerva and Apollo, in the likeness of Vultures, perched on father Jove s high oak tree, proud of their men; and the ranks sat close ranged together, bristling with shield and helmet and spear.
ild.07 In like manner, if Apollo vouchsafe me glory and I slay your champion, I will strip him of his armour and take it to the city of Ilius, where I will hang it in the temple of Apollo, but I will give up his body, that the Achaeans may bury him at their ships, and the build him a mound by the wide waters of the Hellespont.
ild.07 Would, by father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo, that I were still young and strong as when the Pylians and Arcadians were gathered in fight by the rapid river Celadon under the walls of Pheia, and round about the waters of the river Iardanus.
ild.07 This millstone of a rock broke Hector s shield inwards and threw him down on his back with the shield crushing him under it, but Apollo raised him at once.
ild.07 Thus did the Achaeans toil, and the Gods, seated by the side of Jove the lord of lightning, marvelled at their great work; but Neptune, lord of the earthquake, spoke, saying, Father" Jove, what mortal in the whole world will again take the Gods into his counsel? See you not how the Achaeans have built a wall about their ships and driven a trench all round it, without offering Hecatombs to the Gods? The The fame of this wall will reach as far as dawn itself, and men will no longer think anything of the one which Phoebus Apollo and myself built with so much labour for Laomedon.
ild.08 Again he aimed at Hector, for he was longing to hit him, and again his arrow missed, for Apollo turned it aside; but he hit Hector s brave Charioteer Archeptolemus in the breast, by the nipple, as he was driving furiously into the fight.
ild.08 Would that I were as sure of being immortal and never growing old, and of being worshipped like Minerva and Apollo, as I am that this day will bring evil to the Argives.
ild.09 My life is more to me than all the wealth of Ilius while it was yet at peace before the Achaeans went there, or than all the treasure that lies on the stone floor of Apollo s temple beneath the cliffs of Pytho.
ild.09 He it was who took his bow and faced King Apollo himself for fair Marpessa s sake; her father and mother then named her Alcyone, because her mother had mourned with the plaintive strains of the halcyon bird when Phoebus Apollo had carried her off.
ild.10 But Apollo kept no blind look out when he saw Minerva with the son of Tydeus.
ild.11 He had aimed at Hector s head near the top of his helmet, but Bronze was turned by Bronze, and Hector was untouched, for the spear was stayed by the visored helm made with three plates of metal, which Phoebus Apollo had given him.
ild.11 Phoebus Apollo, to whom I ween you pray ere you go into battle, has again saved you, nevertheless I will meet you and make and end of you hereafter, if there is any God who will stand by me too and be my helper.
ild.12 So long as Hector lived and Achilles nursed his anger, and so long as the city of Priam remained untaken, the great wall of the Achaeans stood firm; but when the bravest of the Trojans were no more, and many also of the Argives, though some were yet left alive when, moreover, the city was sacked in the tenth year, and the Argives had gone back with their ships to their own country then Neptune and Apollo took counsel to destroy the wall, and they turned on to it the streams of all the rivers from Mount Ida into the sea, Rhesus, Heptaporus, Caresus, Rhodius, Grenicus, Aesopus, and goodly Scamander, with Simois, where many a shield and helm had fallen, and many a hero of the race of demigods had bitten the dust.
ild.12 Phoebus Apollo turned the mouths of all these rivers together and made them flow for Nine days against the wall, while Jove rained the whole time that he might wash it sooner into the sea.
ild.12 This was what Neptune and Apollo were to do in after time; but as yet battle and turmoil were still raging round the wall till its timbers rang under the blows that rained upon them.
ild.13 But Hector answered, Ajax", braggart and false of tongue, would that I were as sure of being son for evermore to Aegis bearing Jove, with Queen Juno for my mother, and of being held in like honour with Minerva and Apollo, as I am that this day is big with the destruction of the Achaeans; and you shall fall among them if you dare abide my spear; it shall rend your fair body and bid you glut our hounds and birds of prey with your fat and your flesh, as you fall by the ships of the Achaeans.
ild.15 If, then, you are speaking the truth and mean what you say, go among the rank and file of the Gods, and tell Iris and Apollo lord of the bow, that I want them Iris, that she may go to the Achaean host and tell Neptune to leave off fighting and go home, and Apollo, that he may send Hector again into battle and give him fresh strength; he will thus forget his present sufferings, and drive the Achaeans back in confusion till they fall among the ships of Achilles son of Peleus.
ild.15 Meanwhile Juno called Apollo outside, with Iris the messenger of the Gods.
ild.15 Thereon Juno left them and resumed her seat inside, while Iris and Apollo made all haste on their way.
ild.15 Then Jove said to Apollo, "Go, dear Phoebus, to Hector, for Neptune who holds the earth in his embrace has now gone down under the sea to avoid the severity of my displeasure.
ild.15 Apollo obeyed his father s saying, and left the crests of Ida, flying like a falcon, bane of doves and swiftest of all birds.
ild.15 Apollo stood beside him and said, Hector", son of Priam, why are you so faint, and why are you here away from the others? Has any mishap befallen you?"
ild.15 Then King Apollo said to him, "Take heart; the son of Saturn has sent you a mighty helper from Ida to stand by you and defend you, even me, Phoebus Apollo of the Golden sword, who have been guardian hitherto not only of yourself but of your city.
ild.15 Before him went Phoebus Apollo shrouded in cloud about his shoulders.
ild.15 So long as Phoebus Apollo held his aegis quietly and without shaking it, the weapons on either side took effect and the people fell, but when he shook it straight in the face of the Danaans and raised his mighty battle cry their hearts fainted within them and they forgot their former prowess.
ild.15 As when two wild beasts spring in the dead of night on a herd of Cattle or a large flock of Sheep when the herdsman is not there even so were the Danaans struck helpless, for Apollo filled them with panic and gave victory to Hector and the Trojans.
ild.15 Phoebus Apollo went before, and kicked down the banks of the deep trench into its middle so as to make a great broad bridge, as broad as the throw of a spear when a man is trying his strength.
ild.15 The Trojan battalions poured over the bridge, and Apollo with his redoubtable aegis led the way.
ild.15 He kicked down the wall of the Achaeans as easily as a child who playing on the sea shore has built a house of sand and then kicks it down again and destroys it even so did you, O Apollo, shed toil and trouble upon the Argives, filling them with panic and confusion.
ild.15 Hector has just killed him; fetch your deadly arrows at once and the bow which Phoebus Apollo gave you.
ild.15 When Meges saw this he sprang upon him, but Polydamas crouched down, and he missed him, for Apollo would not suffer the son of Panthous to fall in battle; but the spear hit Croesmus in the middle of his chest, whereon he fell heavily to the ground, and Meges stripped him of his armour.
ild.16 And do not for lust of battle go on killing the Trojans nor lead the Achaeans on to Ilius, lest one of the ever living Gods from Olympus attack you for Phoebus Apollo loves them well: return when you have freed the ships from peril, and let others wage war upon the plain.
ild.16 Would, by father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo, that not a single man of all the Trojans might be left alive, nor yet of the Argives, but that we two might be alone left to tear aside the mantle that veils the brow of Troy.
ild.16 Therefore he prayed to far darting Apollo saying, "Hear me O king from your seat, may be in the rich land of Lycia, or may be in Troy, for in all places you can hear the prayer of one who is in distress, as I now am.
ild.16 Thus did he pray, and Apollo heard his prayer.
ild.16 Then Jove lord of the storm cloud said to Apollo, "Dear Phoebus, go, I pray you, and take Sarpedon out of range of the weapons; cleanse the black blood from off him, and then bear him a long way off where you may wash him in the river, anoint him with ambrosia, and clothe him in immortal raiment; this done, commit him to the arms of the two fleet messengers, Death, and Sleep, who will carry him straightway to the rich land of Lycia, where his brothers and kinsmen will inter him, and will raise both mound and pillar to his memory, in due honour to the dead.
ild.16 Apollo obeyed his father s saying, and came down from the heights of Ida into the thick of the fight; forthwith he took Sarpedon out of range of the weapons, and then bore him a long way off, where he washed him in the river, anointed him with ambrosia and clothed him in immortal raiment; this done, he committed him to the arms of the two fleet messengers, Death, and Sleep, who presently set him down in the rich land of Lycia.
ild.16 The sons of the Achaeans would now have taken Troy by the hands of Patroclus, for his spear flew in all directions, had not Phoebus Apollo taken his stand upon the wall to defeat his purpose and to aid the Trojans.
ild.16 Thrice did Patroclus charge at an angle of the high wall, and thrice did Apollo beat him back, striking his shield with his own immortal hands.
ild.16 When Patroclus was coming on like a God for yet a fourth time, Apollo shouted to him with an awful voice and said, "Draw back, noble Patroclus, it is not your lot to sack the city of the Trojan chieftains, nor yet will it be that of Achilles who is a far better man than you are.
ild.16 On hearing this, Patroclus withdrew to some distance and avoided the anger of Apollo.
ild.16 As he was thus doubting Phoebus Apollo drew near him in the likeness of a young and lusty warrior Asius, who was Hector s uncle, being own brother to Hecuba, and son of Dymas who lived in Phrygia by the waters of the river Sangarius; in his likeness Jove s son Apollo now spoke to Hector saying, Hector", why have you left off fighting? It is ill done of you.
ild.16 Drive straight towards Patroclus, if so be that Apollo may grant you a triumph over him, and you may rull him.
ild.16 Apollo passed in among them, and struck panic into the Argives, while he gave triumph to Hector and the Trojans.
ild.16 Phoebus Apollo beat the helmet from off his head, and it rolled rattling off under the Horses feet, where its Horse hair plumes were all begrimed with dust and blood.
ild.16 The Bronze shod spear, so great and so strong, was broken in the hand of Patroclus, while his shield that covered him from head to foot fell to the ground as did also the band that held it, and Apollo undid the fastenings of his corslet.
ild.16 Then, as the life ebbed out of you, you answered, O knight Patroclus: Hector", vaunt as you will, for Jove the son of Saturn and Apollo have vouchsafed you victory; it is they who have vanquished me so easily, and they who have stripped the armour from my shoulders; had Twenty such men as you attacked me, all of them would have fallen before my spear.
ild.17 The son of Atreus would have then carried off the armour of the son of Panthous with ease, had not Phoebus Apollo been angry, and in the guise of Mentes chief of the Cicons incited Hector to attack him.
ild.17 When among the body of his men, he looked around for mighty Ajax son of Telamon, and presently saw him on the extreme left of the fight, cheering on his men and exhorting them to keep on fighting, for Phoebus Apollo had spread a great panic among them.
ild.17 The Trojans would now have been worsted by the brave Achaeans and driven back to Ilius through their own cowardice, while the Argives, so great was their courage and endurance, would have achieved a triumph even against the will of Jove, if Apollo had not roused Aeneas, in the likeness of Periphas son of Epytus, an attendant who had grown old in the service of Aeneas aged father, and was at all times devoted to him.
ild.17 In his likeness, then, Apollo said, Aeneas", can you not manage, even though heaven be against us, to save high Ilius? I have known men, whose numbers, courage, and self reliance have saved their people in spite of Jove, whereas in this case he would much rather give victory to us than to the Danaans, if you would only fight instead of being so terribly afraid.
ild.17 Aeneas knew Apollo when he looked straight at him, and shouted to Hector saying, Hector" and all other Trojans and allies, shame on us if we are beaten by the Achaeans and driven back to Ilius through our own cowardice.
ild.17 Apollo then went up to Hector and spurred him on to fight, in the likeness of Phaenops son of Asius who lived in Abydos and was the most favoured of all Hector s guests.
ild.17 In his likeness Apollo said, Hector", who of the Achaeans will fear you henceforward now that you have quailed before Menelaus who has ever been rated poorly as a soldier? Yet he has now got a corpse away from the Trojans single handed, and has slain your own true comrade, a man brave among the foremost, Podes son of Eetion.
ild.18 All day long they fought by the Scaean gates and would have taken the city there and then, had not Apollo vouchsafed glory to Hector and slain the valiant son of Menoetius after he had done the Trojans much evil.
ild.20 Mars of gleaming helmet joined the Trojans, and with him Apollo of locks unshorn, and the archer Goddess Diana, Leto, Xanthus, and laughter loving Venus.
ild.20 Apollo with his arrows took his stand to face King Neptune, while Minerva took hers against the God of war; the archer goddess Diana with her Golden arrows, sister of far darting Apollo, stood to face Juno; Mercury the lusty bringer of good luck faced Leto, while the mighty eddying river whom men can Scamander, but Gods Xanthus, matched himself against Vulcan.
ild.20 Meanwhile Apollo set Aeneas on to attack the son of Peleus, and put courage into his heart, speaking with the voice of Lycaon son of Priam.
ild.20 Then said King Apollo, son to Jove, "Nay, hero, pray to the ever living Gods, for men say that you were born of Jove s daughter Venus, whereas Achilles is son to a Goddess of inferior rank.
ild.20 She called the Gods about her, and said, "Look to it, you two, Neptune and Minerva, and consider how this shall be; Phoebus Apollo has been sending Aeneas clad in full armour to fight Achilles.
ild.20 If Mars or Phoebus Apollo begin fighting, or keep Achilles in check so that he cannot fight, we too, will at once raise the cry of battle, and in that case they will soon leave the field and go back vanquished to Olympus among the other Gods.
ild.20 Fool that he was to give ear to the counsel of Apollo.
ild.20 Apollo will never save him from destruction.
ild.20 But Phoebus Apollo came up to Hector and said, Hector", on no account must you challenge Achilles to single combat; keep a lookout for him while you are under cover of the others and away from the thick of the fight, otherwise he will either hit you with a spear or cut you down at close quarters.
ild.20 Achilles then sprang furiously on him with a loud cry, bent on killing him, but Apollo caught him up easily as a God can, and hid him in a thick darkness.
ild.20 Phoebus Apollo, to whom it seems you pray before you go into battle, has again saved you; but if I too have any friend among the Gods I will surely make an end of you when I come across you at some other time.
ild.21 But the river said to Apollo, "Surely, son of Jove, lord of the Silver bow, you are not obeying the commands of Jove who charged you straitly that you should stand by the Trojans and defend them, till twilight fades, and darkness is over an the earth.
ild.21 She told me I was to fall under the walls of Troy by the flying arrows of Apollo; would that Hector, the best man among the Trojans, might there slay me; then should I fall a hero by the hand of a hero; whereas now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end, trapped in this river as though I were some swineherd s boy, who gets carried down a torrent while trying to cross it during a storm.
ild.21 Meanwhile King Neptune turned to Apollo saying, Phoebus", why should we keep each other at arm s length? it is not well, now that the others have begun fighting; it will be disgraceful to us if we return to Jove s Bronze floored mansion on Olympus without having fought each other; therefore come on, you are the younger of the two, and I ought not to attack you, for I am older and have had more experience.
ild.21 And King Apollo answered, Lord" of the earthquake, you would have no respect for me if I were to fight you about a pack of miserable mortals, who come out like leaves in summer and eat the fruit of the field, and presently fall lifeless to the ground.
ild.21 Apollo made her no answer, but Jove s august queen was angry and upbraided her bitterly.
ild.21 Thus did they converse, and meanwhile Phoebus Apollo entered the strong city of Ilius, for he was uneasy lest the wall should not hold out and the Danaans should take the city then and there, before its hour had come; but the rest of the ever living Gods went back, some angry and some triumphant to Olympus, where they took their seats beside Jove lord of the storm cloud, while Achilles still kept on dealing out death alike on the Trojans and on their As when the smoke from some burning city ascends to heaven when the anger of the Gods has kindled it there is then toil for all, and sorrow for not a few even so did Achilles bring toil and sorrow on the Trojans.
ild.21 Apollo then came full speed out of the city to meet them and protect them.
ild.21 Then had the sons of the Achaeans taken the lofty gates of Troy if Apollo had not spurred on Agenor, valiant and noble son to Antenor.
ild.21 Achilles in his turn attacked noble Agenor, but Apollo would not vouchsafe him glory, for he snatched Agenor away and hid him in a thick mist, sending him out of the battle unmolested Then he craftily drew the son of Peleus away from going after the host, for he put on the semblance of Agenor and stood in front of Achilles, who ran towards him to give him chase and pursued him over the corn lands of the plain, turning him towards the deep waters of the river Scamander.
ild.21 Apollo ran but a little way before him and beguiled Achilles by making him think all the time that he was on the point of overtaking him.
ild.22 Then Phoebus Apollo spoke to the son of Peleus saying, "Why, son of Peleus, do you, who are but man, give chase to me who am immortal? Have you not yet found out that it is a God whom you pursue so furiously? You did not harass the Trojans whom you had routed, and now they are within their walls, while you have been decoyed hither away from them.
ild.22 As a man in a dream who fails to lay hands upon another whom he is pursuing the one cannot escape nor the other overtake even so neither could Achilles come up with Hector, nor Hector break away from Achilles; nevertheless he might even yet have escaped death had not the time come when Apollo, who thus far had sustained his strength and nerved his running, was now no longer to stay by him.
ild.22 As he held the scales by the middle, the doom of Hector fell down deep into the house of Hades and then Phoebus Apollo left him.
ild.22 Do what Apollo may as he lies grovelling before his father, aegis bearing Jove, Hector cannot escape us longer.
ild.22 I deemed that the hero Deiphobus was by my side, but he is within the wall, and Minerva has inveigled me; death is now indeed exceedingly near at hand and there is no way out of it for so Jove and his son Apollo the far darter have willed it, though heretofore they have been ever ready to protect me.
ild.22 Hector with his dying breath then said, "I know you what you are, and was sure that I should not move you, for your heart is hard as iron; look to it that I bring not heaven s anger upon you on the day when Paris and Phoebus Apollo, valiant though you be, shall slay you at the Scaean gates.
ild.23 Phoebus Apollo moreover sent a dark cloud from heaven to earth, which gave shade to the whole place where Hector lay, that the heat of the sun might not parch his body.
ild.23 Next to him rose mighty Diomed son of Tydeus; he yoked the Trojan Horses which he had taken from Aeneas, when Apollo bore him out of the fight.
ild.23 Diomed would have now passed him, or there would have been a dead heat, but Phoebus Apollo to spite him made him drop his whip.
ild.23 Minerva saw the trick which Apollo had played the son of Tydeus, so she brought him his whip and put spirit into his Horses; moreover she went after the son of Admetus in a rage and broke his yoke for him; the mares went one to one side the course, and the other to the other, and the pole was broken against the ground.
ild.23 He to whom Apollo vouchsafes the greater endurance, and whom the Achaeans acknowledge as victor, shall take the Mule back with him to his own tent, while he that is vanquished shall have the double cup.
ild.23 He let fly with his arrow forthwith, but he did not promise Hecatombs of firstling lambs to King Apollo, and missed his bird, for Apollo foiled his aim; but he hit the string with which the bird was tied, near its foot; the arrow cut the string clean through so that it hung down towards the ground, while the bird flew up into the sky, and the Achaeans shouted applause.
ild.23 Meriones, who had his arrow ready while Teucer was aiming, snatched the bow out of his hand, and at once promised that he would sacrifice a Hecatomb of firstling lambs to Apollo lord of the bow; then espying the Pigeon high up under the clouds, he hit her in the middle of the wing as she was circling upwards; the arrow went clean through the wing and fixed itself in the ground at Meriones feet, but the bird perched on the ship s mast hanging her head and with all her feathers drooping; the life went out of her, and she fell heavily from the mast.
ild.24 But Apollo would not suffer it to be disfigured, for he pitied the man, dead though he now was; therefore he shielded him with his Golden aegis continually, that he might take no hurt while Achilles was dragging him.
ild.24 When, therefore, the morning of the twelfth day had now come, Phoebus Apollo spoke among the immortals saying, "You Gods ought to be ashamed of yourselves; you are cruel and hard hearted.
ild.24 Apollo killed the sons with arrows from his Silver bow, to punish Niobe, and Diana slew the daughters, because Niobe had vaunted herself against Leto; she said Leto had borne two children only, whereas she had herself borne many whereon the two killed the many.
ild.24 So long as you were alive the Gods loved you well, and even in death they have not been utterly unmindful of you; for when Achilles took any other of my sons, he would sell him beyond the seas, to Samos Imbrus or rugged Lemnos; and when he had slain you too with his sword, many a time did he drag you round the sepulchre of his comrade though this could not give him life yet here you lie all fresh as dew, and comely as one whom Apollo has slain with his painless shafts.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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