Argos

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 21 Sep 2011 13:22 and updated at 21 Sep 2011 13:22

ILIAD NOUN

ild.01 She shall grow old in my house at Argos far from her own home, busying herself with her loom and visiting my couch; so go, and do not provoke me or it shall be the worse for you.
ild.02 Atreus, when he died, left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes in his turn left it to be borne by Agamemnon, that he might be lord of all Argos and of the isles.
ild.02 Cruel Jove gave me his solemn promise that I should sack the city of Priam before returning, but he has played me false, and is now bidding me go ingloriously back to Argos with the loss of much people.
ild.02 They forget the promise they made you when they set out from Argos, that you should not return till you had sacked the town of Troy, and, like children or widowed Women, they murmur and would set off homeward.
ild.02 Stand, therefore, son of Atreus, by your own steadfast purpose; lead the Argives on to battle, and leave this handful of men to rot, who scheme, and scheme in vain, to get back to Argos ere they have learned whether Jove be true or a liar.
ild.02 The men of Argos, again, and those who held the walls of Tiryns, with Hermione, and Asine upon the gulf; Troezene, Eionae, and the vineyard lands of Epidaurus; the Achaean youths, moreover, who came from Aegina and Mases; these were led by Diomed of the loud battle cry, and Sthenelus son of famed Capaneus.
ild.02 Those again who held Pelasgic Argos, Alos, Alope, and Trachis; and those of Phthia and Hellas the land of fair Women, who were called Myrmidons, Hellenes, and Achaeans; these had Fifty ships, over which Achilles was in command.
ild.03 Let him who shall be victorious and prove to be the better man take the Woman and all she has, to bear them to his home, but let the rest swear to a solemn covenant of peace whereby you Trojans shall stay here in Troy, while the others go home to Argos and the land of the Achaeans.
ild.03 We are to swear to a solemn covenant of peace whereby we others shall dwell here in Troy, while the Achaeans return to Argos and the land of the Achaeans.
ild.04 Menelaus"," said he, "has two good friends among the Goddesses, Juno of Argos, and Minerva of Alalcomene, but they only sit still and look on, while Venus keeps ever by Alexandrus side to defend him in any danger; indeed she has just rescued him when he made sure that it was all over with him for the victory really did lie with Menelaus.
ild.04 "My own three favourite cities," answered Juno, "are Argos, Sparta, and Mycenae.
ild.04 This shall surely be; but how, Menelaus, shall I mourn you, if it be your lot now to die? I should return to Argos as a by word, for the Achaeans will at once go home.
ild.05 But Juno of Argos and Minerva of Alalcomene, now that they had put a stop to the murderous doings of Mars, went back again to the house of Jove.
ild.06 There is a city in the heart of Argos, pasture land of Horses, called Ephyra, where Sisyphus lived, who was the craftiest of all mankind.
ild.06 Henceforth, however, I must be your host in middle Argos, and you mine in Lycia, if I should ever go there; let us avoid one another s spears even during a general engagement; there are many noble Trojans and allies whom I can kill, if I overtake them and heaven delivers them into my hand; so again with yourself, there are many Achaeans whose lives you may take if you can; we two, then, will exchange armour, that all present may know of the old ties that subsist between us.
ild.06 It may be that you will have to ply the loom in Argos at the bidding of a mistress, or to fetch water from the springs Messeis or Hypereia, treated brutally by some cruel task master; then will one say who sees you weeping, She was wife to Hector, the bravest warrior among the Trojans during the war before Ilius.
ild.07 I will speak plainly, and hereby notify to the Trojans that I will not give up the Woman; but the wealth that I brought home with her from Argos I will restore, and will add yet further of my own.
ild.09 Cruel Jove gave me his solemn promise that I should sack the city of Troy before returning, but he has played me false, and is now bidding me go ingloriously back to Argos with the loss of much people.
ild.09 Then, when we reach Achaean Argos, wealthiest of all lands, he shall be my son in law and I will show him like honour with my own dear son Orestes, who is being nurtured in all abundance.
ild.09 He vows that he will hew the high sterns of our ships in pieces, set fire to their hulls, and make havoc of the Achaeans while they are dazed and smothered in smoke; I much fear that heaven will make good his boasting, and it will prove our lot to perish at Troy far from our home in Argos.
ild.09 Then, when we reach Achaean Argos, wealthiest of all lands, you shall be his son in law, and he will show you like honour with his own dear son Orestes, who is being nurtured in all abundance.
ild.12 If, indeed, great Jove is minded to help the Trojans, and in his anger will utterly destroy the Achaeans, I would myself gladly see them perish now and here far from Argos; but if they should rally and we are driven back from the ships pell mell into the trench there will be not so much as a man get back to the city to tell the tale.
ild.13 None are held back neither by fear nor slackness, but it seems to be the of almighty Jove that the Achaeans should perish ingloriously here far from Argos: you, Thoas, have been always staunch, and you keep others in heart if you see any fail in duty; be not then remiss now, but exhort all to do their utmost.
ild.13 We too will make you an offer; we will give you the loveliest daughter of the son of Atreus, and will bring her from Argos for you to marry, if you will sack the goodly city of Ilius in company with ourselves; so come along with me, that we may make a covenant at the ships about the marriage, and we will not be hard upon you about gifts of wooing.
ild.14 And King Agamemnon answered, Nestor", if the Trojans are indeed fighting at the rear of our ships, and neither the wall nor the trench has served us over which the Danaans toiled so hard, and which they deemed would be an impregnable bulwark both for us and our fleet I see it must be the will of Jove that the Achaeans should perish ingloriously here, far from Argos.
ild.14 Oeeneus remained in his own country, but my father (as Jove and the other Gods ordained it) migrated to Argos.
ild.15 All the Gods in Olympus were in a fury, but they could not reach you to set you free; when I caught any one of them I gripped him and hurled him from the heavenly threshold till he came fainting down to earth; yet even this did not relieve my mind from the incessant anxiety which I felt about noble Hercules whom you and Boreas had spitefully conveyed beyond the seas to Cos, after suborning the tempests; but I rescued him, and notwithstanding all his mighty labours I brought him back again to Argos.
ild.15 Father" Jove," said he, "if ever any one in wheat growing Argos burned you fat thigh bones of Sheep or heifer and prayed that he might return safely home, whereon you bowed your head to him in assent, bear it in mind now, and suffer not the Trojans to triumph thus over the Achaeans.
ild.16 Polymele, daughter of Phylas the graceful dancer, bore him; the mighty slayer of Argos was enamoured of her as he saw her among the singing Women at a dance held in honour of Diana the rushing huntress of the Golden arrows; he therefore Mercury, giver of all good went with her into an upper chamber, and lay with her in secret, whereon she bore him a noble son Eudorus, singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant.
ild.19 For Juno darted down from the high summit of Olympus, and went in haste to Achaean Argos where she knew that the noble wife of Sthenelus son of Perseus then was.
ild.19 Till now I made sure that I alone was to fall here at Troy away from Argos, while you were to return to Phthia, bring back my son with you in your own ship, and show him all my property, my bondsmen, and the greatness of my house for Peleus must surely be either dead, or what little life remains to him is oppressed alike with the infirmities of age and ever present fear lest he should hear the sad tidings of my death.
ild.24 Then answered the slayer of Argus, guide and guardian, Sir", you are tempting me and playing upon my youth, but you shall not move me, for you are offering me presents without the knowledge of Achilles whom I fear and hold it great guiltless to defraud, lest some evil presently befall me; but as your guide I would go with you even to Argos itself, and would guard you so carefully whether by sea or land, that no one should attack you through making light of him who was with you.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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