Asius

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 21 Sep 2011 13:26 and updated at 21 Sep 2011 13:26

ILIAD NOUN

ild.02 They that dwelt about Percote and Practius, with Sestos, Abydos, and Arisbe these were led by Asius, son of Hyrtacus, a brave commander Asius, the son of Hyrtacus, whom his powerful dark bay steeds, of the breed that comes from the river Selleis, had brought from Arisbe.
ild.12 The next company was led by Paris, Alcathous, and Agenor; the third by Helenus and Deiphobus, two sons of Priam, and with them was the hero Asius Asius the son of Hyrtacus, whose great black Horses of the breed that comes from the river Selleis had brought him from Arisbe.
ild.12 The rest of the Trojans and their allies now followed the counsel of Polydamas but Asius son of Hyrtacus would not leave his Horses and his esquire behind him; in his foolhardiness he took them on with him towards the ships, nor did he fail to come by his end in consequence.
ild.12 These stood before the gates like two high oak trees upon the mountains, that tower from their wide spreading roots, and year after year battle with wind and rain even so did these two men await the onset of great Asius confidently and without flinching.
ild.12 The Trojans led by him and by Iamenus, Orestes, Adamas the son of Asius, Thoon and Oenomaus, raised a loud cry of battle and made straight for the wall, holding their shields of dry ox hide above their heads; for a while the two defenders remained inside and cheered the Achaeans on to stand firm in the defence of their ships; when, however, they saw that the Trojans were attacking the wall, while the Danaans were crying out for help and being routed, they rushed outside and fought in front of the gates like two wild boars upon the mountains that abide the attack of men and Dogs, and charging on either side break down the Wood all round them tearing it up by the roots, and one can hear the clattering of their tusks, till some one hits them and makes an end of them even so did the gleaming Bronze rattle about their breasts, as the weapons fell upon them; for they fought with great fury, trusting to their own prowess and to those who were on the wall above them.
ild.12 Helmet and shield rang out as the great stones rained upon them, and Asius the son of Hyrtacus in his dismay cried aloud and smote his two thighs.
ild.13 With this Idomeneus began dragging him by the foot through the thick of the fight, but Asius came up to protect the body, on foot, in front of his Horses which his esquire drove so close behind him that he could feel their breath upon his shoulder.
ild.13 Deiphobus then came close up to Idomeneus to avenge Asius, and took aim at him with a spear, but Idomeneus was on the look out and avoided it, for he was covered by the round shield he always bore a shield of oxhide and Bronze with two arm rods on the inside.
ild.13 Deiphobus vaunted over him and cried with a loud voice saying, "Of a truth Asius has not fallen unavenied; he will be glad even while passing into the house of Hades, strong warden of the gate, that I have sent some one to escort him.
ild.13 As he was thus aiming among the crowd, he was seen by Adamas son of Asius, who rushed towards him and struck him with a spear in the middle of his shield, but Neptune made its point without effect, for he grudged him the life of Antilochus.
ild.13 When they heard his voice they all hastened to gather round Polydamas the excellent son of Panthous, but Hector kept on among the foremost, looking everywhere to find Deiphobus and prince Helenus, Adamas son of Asius, and Asius son of Hyrtacus; living, indeed, and scatheless he could no longer find them, for the two last were lying by the sterns of the Achaean ships, slain by the Argives, while the others had been also stricken and wounded by them; but upon the left wing of the dread battle he found Alexandrus, husband of lovely Helen, cheering his men and urging them on to fight.
ild.13 Paris"," said he, "evil hearted Paris, fair to see but Woman mad and false of tongue, where are Deiphobus and King Helenus? Where are Adamas son of Asius, and Asius son of Hyrtacus? Where too is Othryoneus? Ilius is undone and will now surely fall!"
ild.16 As he was thus doubting Phoebus Apollo drew near him in the likeness of a young and lusty warrior Asius, who was Hector s uncle, being own brother to Hecuba, and son of Dymas who lived in Phrygia by the waters of the river Sangarius; in his likeness Jove s son Apollo now spoke to Hector saying, Hector", why have you left off fighting? It is ill done of you.
ild.17 Apollo then went up to Hector and spurred him on to fight, in the likeness of Phaenops son of Asius who lived in Abydos and was the most favoured of all Hector s guests.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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