Jove

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 21 Sep 2011 11:26 and updated at 21 Sep 2011 11:26

ILIAD NOUN

ild.01 Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a hero did it yield a prey to Dogs and Vultures, for so were the counsels of Jove fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles, first fell out with one another.
ild.01 And which of the Gods was it that set them on to quarrel? It was the son of Jove and Leto; for he was angry with the king and sent a pestilence upon the host to plague the people, because the son of Atreus had dishonoured Chryses his priest.
ild.01 Sons" of Atreus," he cried, "and all other Achaeans, may the Gods who dwell in Olympus grant you to sack the city of Priam, and to reach your homes in safety; but free my daughter, and accept a ransom for her, in reverence to Apollo, son of Jove.
ild.01 Let us ask some priest or prophet, or some reader of dreams (for dreams, too, are of Jove) who can tell us why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, and say whether it is for some vow that we have broken, or Hecatomb that we have not offered, and whether he will accept the savour of lambs and Goats without blemish, so as to take away the plague from us.
ild.01 Give this girl, therefore, to the God, and if ever Jove grants us to sack the city of Troy we will requite you three and fourfold.
ild.01 I have others here who will do me honour, and above all Jove, the lord of counsel.
ild.01 "Why are you here," said he, "daughter of aegis bearing Jove? To see the pride of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? Let me tell you and it shall surely be he shall pay for this insolence with his life.
ild.01 Then she went back to Olympus among the other Gods, and to the house of aegis bearing Jove.
ild.01 Therefore, Agamemnon, though you be strong, take not this girl away, for the sons of the Achaeans have already given her to Achilles; and you, Achilles, strive not further with the king, for no man who by the grace of Jove wields a sceptre has like honour with Agamemnon.
ild.01 He raised his hands in prayer to his immortal mother, Mother"," he cried, "you bore me doomed to live but for a little season; surely Jove, who thunders from Olympus, might have made that little glorious.
ild.01 Go to Olympus, and if you have ever done him service in word or deed, implore the aid of Jove.
ild.01 Would indeed that you had lived your span free from all sorrow at your ships, for it is all too brief; alas, that you should be at once short of life and long of sorrow above your peers: woe, therefore, was the hour in which I bore you; nevertheless I will go to the snowy heights of Olympus, and tell this tale to Jove, if he will hear our prayer: meanwhile stay where you are with your ships, nurse your anger against the Achaeans, and hold aloof from fight.
ild.01 For Jove went yesterday to Oceanus, to a feast among the Ethiopians, and the other Gods went with him.
ild.01 Now after Twelve days the immortal Gods came back in a body to Olympus, and Jove led the way.
ild.01 Father" Jove, if I ever did you service in word or deed among the immortals, hear my prayer, and do honour to my son, whose life is to be cut short so early.
ild.01 Jove sat for a while silent, and without a word, but Thetis still kept firm hold of his knees, and besought him a second time.
ild.01 At this Jove was much troubled and answered, "I shall have trouble if you set me quarrelling with Juno, for she will provoke me with her taunting speeches; even now she is always railing at me before the other Gods and accusing me of giving aid to the Trojans.
ild.01 When the pair had thus laid their plans, they parted Jove to his house, while the Goddess quitted the splendour of Olympus, and plunged into the depths of the sea.
ild.01 Wife"," said Jove, "I can do nothing but you suspect me and find it out.
ild.01 But the heavenly beings were disquieted throughout the house of Jove, till the cunning workman Vulcan began to try and pacify his mother Juno.
ild.01 Let me then advise my mother and she must herself know that it will be better to make friends with my dear father Jove, lest he again scold her and disturb our feast.
ild.01 I love you dearly, and should be very sorry to see you get a thrashing; however grieved I might be, I could not help for there is no standing against Jove.
ild.01 So Jove, the Olympian Lord of Thunder, hied him to the bed in which he always slept; and when he had got on to it he went to sleep, with Juno of the Golden throne by his side.
ild.02 Now the other Gods and the armed warriors on the plain slept soundly, but Jove was wakeful, for he was thinking how to do honour to Achilles, and destroyed much people at the ships of the Achaeans.
ild.02 Hear me at once, for I come as a messenger from Jove, who, though he be not near, yet takes thought for you and pities you.
ild.02 There are no longer divided counsels among the Gods; Juno has brought them over to her own mind, and woe betides the Trojans at the hands of Jove.
ild.02 He thought that on that same day he was to take the city of Priam, but he little knew what was in the mind of Jove, who had many another hard fought fight in store alike for Danaans and Trojans.
ild.02 The Goddess Dawn now wended her way to vast Olympus that she might herald day to Jove and to the other immortals, and Agamemnon sent the criers round to call the people in assembly; so they called them and the people gathered thereon.
ild.02 Hear me at once, for I am a messenger from Jove, who, though he be not near, yet takes thought for you and pities you.
ild.02 There are no longer divided counsels among the Gods; Juno has brought them over to her own mind, and woe betides the Trojans at the hands of Jove.
ild.02 They swarmed like bees that sally from some hollow cave and flit in countless throng among the spring flowers, bunched in knots and clusters; even so did the mighty multitude pour from ships and tents to the assembly, and range themselves upon the wide watered shore, while among them ran Wildfire Rumour, messenger of Jove, urging them ever to the fore.
ild.02 This was the work of Vulcan, who gave it to Jove the son of Saturn.
ild.02 Jove gave it to Mercury, slayer of Argus, guide and guardian.
ild.02 Cruel Jove gave me his solemn promise that I should sack the city of Priam before returning, but he has played me false, and is now bidding me go ingloriously back to Argos with the loss of much people.
ild.02 Such is the will of Jove, who has laid many a proud city in the dust, as he will yet lay others, for his power is above all.
ild.02 Nine of Jove years are gone; the timbers of our ships have rotted; their tackling is sound no longer.
ild.02 But Juno said to Minerva, "Alas, daughter of aegis bearing Jove, unweariable, shall the Argives fly home to their own land over the broad sea, and leave Priam and the Trojans the glory of still keeping Helen, for whose sake so many of the Achaeans have died at Troy, far from their homes? Go about at once among the host, and speak fairly to them, man by man, that they draw not their ships into the sea.
ild.02 There she found Ulysses, peer of Jove in counsel, standing alone.
ild.02 We were not all of us at the council to hear what he then said; see to it lest he be angry and do us a mischief; for the pride of kings is great, and the hand of Jove is with them.
ild.02 Then we saw a prodigy; for Jove sent a fearful Serpent out of the ground, with blood red stains upon its back, and it darted from under the altar on to the plane tree.
ild.02 Why, Achaeans, said he, are you thus speechless? Jove has sent us this sign, long in coming, and long ere it be fulfilled, though its fame shall last for ever.
ild.02 Stand, therefore, son of Atreus, by your own steadfast purpose; lead the Argives on to battle, and leave this handful of men to rot, who scheme, and scheme in vain, to get back to Argos ere they have learned whether Jove be true or a liar.
ild.02 Would, by Father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo, that I had among them Ten more such councillors, for the city of King Priam would then soon fall beneath our hands, and we should sack it.
ild.02 They stood round the Bull with the barley meal in their hands, and Agamemnon prayed, saying, Jove", most glorious, supreme, that dwellest in heaven, and ridest upon the storm cloud, grant that the sun may not go down, nor the night fall, till the palace of Priam is laid low, and its gates are consumed with fire.
ild.02 The chiefs disposed their men this way and that before the fight began, drafting them out as easily as Goat herds draft their flocks when they have got mixed while feeding; and among them went King Agamemnon, with a head and face like Jove the lord of thunder, a waist like Mars, and a chest like that of Neptune.
ild.02 As some great Bull that lords it over the herds upon the plain, even so did Jove make the son of Atreus stand peerless among the multitude of heroes.
ild.02 And now, O Muses, dwellers in the mansions of Olympus, tell me for you are Goddesses and are in all places so that you see all things, while we know nothing but by report who were the chiefs and princes of the Danaans? As for the common soldiers, they were so that I could not name every single one of them though I had Ten tongues, and though my voice failed not and my heart were of Bronze within me, unless you, O Olympian Muses, daughters of aegis bearing Jove, were to recount them to me.
ild.02 And they that held the strong city of Athens, the people of great Erechtheus, who was born of the soil itself, but Jove s daughter, Minerva, fostered him, and established him at Athens in her own rich sanctuary.
ild.02 He was returning from Oechalia, where Eurytus lived and reigned, and boasted that he would surpass even the Muses, daughters of aegis bearing Jove, if they should sing against him; whereon they were angry, and maimed him.
ild.02 And those of Dulichium with the sacred Echinean islands, who dwelt beyond the sea off Elis; these were led by Meges, peer of Mars, and the son of valiant Phyleus, dear to Jove, who quarrelled with his father, and went to settle in Dulichium.
ild.02 These were led by Ulysses, peer of Jove in counsel, and with him there came Twelve ships.
ild.02 during which he suffered great hardship, he came to Rhodes, where the people divided into three communities, according to their tribes, and were dearly loved by Jove, the lord, of Gods and men; wherefore the son of Saturn showered down great riches upon them.
ild.02 He was son of Pirithous, who was son of Jove himself, for Hippodameia bore him to Pirithous on the day when he took his revenge on the shaggy mountain savages and drove them from Mt.
ild.02 And now Iris, fleet as the wind, was sent by Jove to tell the bad news among the Trojans.
ild.03 Bring, then, two lambs, a white ram and a black ewe, for Earth and Sun, and we will bring a third for Jove.
ild.03 Moreover, you shall bid Priam come, that he may swear to the covenant himself; for his sons are high handed and ill to trust, and the oaths of Jove must not be transgressed or taken in vain.
ild.03 Father" Jove," he cried, "that rulest in Ida, most glorious in power, and thou oh Sun, that seest and givest ear to all things, Earth and Rivers, and ye who in the realms below chastise the soul of him that has broken his oath, witness these rites and guard them, that they be not vain.
ild.03 Then they poured wine from the mixing bowl into the cups, and prayed to the everlasting Gods, saying, Trojans and Achaeans among one another, Jove", most great and glorious, and ye other everlasting Gods, grant that the brains of them who shall first sin against their oaths of them and their children may be shed upon the ground even as this wine, and let their wives become the slaves of strangers.
ild.03 Thus they prayed, but not as yet would Jove grant them their prayer.
ild.03 Then Priam, descendant of Dardanus, spoke, saying, "Hear me, Trojans and Achaeans, I will now go back to the wind beaten city of Ilius: I dare not with my own eyes witness this fight between my son and Menelaus, for Jove and the other immortals alone know which shall fall.
ild.03 Meanwhile the two hosts lifted up their hands and prayed saying, Father" Jove, that rulest from Ida, most glorious in power, grant that he who first brought about this war between us may die, and enter the house of Hades, while we others remain at peace and abide by our oaths.
ild.03 Menelaus next took aim, praying to Father Jove as he did so.
ild.03 King" Jove," he said, "grant me revenge on Alexandrus who has wronged me; subdue him under my hand that in ages yet to come a man may shrink from doing ill deeds in the house of his host.
ild.03 Then the son of Atreus drew his sword, and drove at the projecting part of his helmet, but the sword fell shivered in three or four pieces from his hand, and he cried, looking towards Heaven, Father" Jove, of all Gods thou art the most despiteful; I made sure of my revenge, but the sword has broken in my hand, my spear has been hurled in vain, and I have not killed him.
ild.03 The strap of the helmet that went under his chin was choking him, and Menelaus would have dragged him off to his own great glory had not Jove s daughter Venus been quick to mark and to break the strap of oxhide, so that the empty helmet came away in his hand.
ild.03 On this Helen, daughter of aegis bearing Jove, sat down, and with eyes askance began to upbraid her husband.
ild.04 Now the Gods were sitting with Jove in council upon the Golden floor while Hebe went round pouring out nectar for them to drink, and as they pledged one another in their cups of Gold they looked down upon the town of Troy.
ild.04 Jove was angry and answered, "My dear, what harm have Priam and his sons done you that you are so hotly bent on sacking the city of Ilius? Will nothing do for you but you must within their walls and eat Priam raw, with his sons and all the other Trojans to boot? Have it your own way then; for I would not have this matter become a bone of contention between us.
ild.04 The Trojans and Achaeans were struck with awe as they beheld, and one would turn to his neighbour, saying, "Either we shall again have war and din of combat, or Jove the lord of battle will now make peace between us.
ild.04 But the blessed Gods did not forget thee, O Menelaus, and Jove s daughter, driver of the spoil, was the first to stand before thee and ward off the piercing arrow.
ild.04 Argives"," said he, "slacken not one whit in your onset; father Jove will be no helper of liars; the Trojans have been the first to break their oaths and to attack us; therefore they shall be devoured of Vultures; we shall take their city and carry off their wives and children in our ships.
ild.04 Would, by father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo that all were so minded as you are, for the city of Priam would then soon fall beneath our hands, and we should sack it.
ild.04 The men of Mycenae were willing to let them have one, but Jove dissuaded them by showing them unfavourable omens.
ild.04 We boast ourselves as even better men than our fathers; we took Seven gated Thebes, though the wall was stronger and our men were fewer in number, for we trusted in the omens of the Gods and in the help of Jove, whereas they perished through their own sheer folly; hold not, then, our fathers in like honour with us.
ild.04 Thus spoke the mighty God, crying to them from the city, while Jove s redoubtable daughter, the Trito born, went about among the host of the Achaeans, and urged them forward whenever she beheld them slackening.
ild.05 Minerva, therefore, took Mars by the hand and said, Mars", Mars, bane of men, bloodstained stormer of cities, may we not now leave the Trojans and Achaeans to fight it out, and see to which of the two Jove will vouchsafe the victory? Let us go away, and thus avoid his anger.
ild.05 Then Diomed prayed, saying, "Hear me, daughter of aegis bearing Jove, unweariable, if ever you loved my father well and stood by him in the thick of a fight, do the like now by me; grant me to come within a spear s throw of that man and kill him.
ild.05 If, then, any other God comes here and offers you battle, do not fight him; but should Jove s daughter Venus come, strike her with your spear and wound her.
ild.05 When he had found the brave son of Lycaon he said, Pandarus", where is now your bow, your winged arrows, and your renown as an archer, in respect of which no man here can rival you nor is there any in Lycia that can beat you? Lift then your hands to Jove and send an arrow at this fellow who is going so masterfully about, and has done such deadly work among the Trojans.
ild.05 If Jove again vouchsafes glory to the son of Tydeus they will carry us safely back to the city.
ild.05 They are of the stock that great Jove gave to Tros in payment for his son Ganymede, and are the finest that live and move under the sun.
ild.05 And now Aeneas, king of men, would have perished then and there, had not his mother, Jove s daughter Venus, who had conceived him by Anchises when he was herding Cattle, been quick to mark, and thrown her two white arms about the body of her dear son.
ild.05 Venus screamed aloud, and let her son fall, but Phoebus Apollo caught him in his arms, and hid him in a cloud of darkness, lest some Danaan should drive a spear into his breast and kill him; and Diomed shouted out as he left her, Daughter" of Jove, leave war and battle alone, can you not be contented with beguiling silly Women? If you meddle with fighting you will get what will make you shudder at the very name of war.
ild.05 I am badly wounded by a mortal, the son of Tydeus, who would now fight even with father Jove.
ild.05 So, also, did huge Hades, when this same man, the son of aegis bearing Jove, hit him with an arrow even at the gates of hell, and hurt him badly.
ild.05 Thereon Hades went to the house of Jove on great Olympus, angry and full of pain; and the arrow in his brawny shoulder caused him great anguish till Paeeon healed him by spreading soothing herbs on the wound, for Hades was not of mortal mould.
ild.05 But Minerva and Juno, who were looking on, began to taunt Jove with their mocking talk, and Minerva was first to speak.
ild.05 Father" Jove," said she, "do not be angry with me, but I think the Cyprian must have been persuading some one of the Achaean Women to go with the Trojans of whom she is so very fond, and while caressing one or other of them she must have torn her delicate hand with the Gold pin of the Woman s brooch.
ild.05 Then Phoebus Apollo said to Mars, Mars", Mars, bane of men, blood stained stormer of cities, can you not go to this man, the son of Tydeus, who would now fight even with father Jove, and draw him out of the battle? He first went up to the Cyprian and wounded her in the hand near her wrist, and afterwards sprang upon me too, as though he were a God.
ild.05 Presently the strong hand of fate impelled Tlepolemus, the son of Hercules, a man both brave and of great stature, to fight Sarpedon; so the two, son and grandson of great Jove, drew near to one another, and Tlepolemus spoke first.
ild.05 Sarpedon"," said he, "councillor of the Lycians, why should you come skulking here you who are a man of peace? They lie who call you son of aegis bearing Jove, for you are little like those who were of old his children.
ild.05 He doubted whether to pursue the son of Jove, or to make slaughter of the Lycian rank and file; it was not decreed, however, that he should slay the son of Jove; Minerva, therefore, turned him against the main body of the Lycians.
ild.05 His comrades then bore Sarpedon away and laid him beneath Jove s spreading oak tree.
ild.05 Now when the Goddess Juno saw the Argives thus falling, she said to Minerva, "Alas, daughter of aegis bearing Jove, unweariable, the promise we made Menelaus that he should not return till he had sacked the city of Ilius will be of none effect if we let Mars rage thus furiously.
ild.05 Meanwhile Minerva flung her richly embroidered vesture, made with her own hands, on to her father s threshold, and donned the shirt of Jove, arming herself for battle.
ild.05 her shoulders, wreathed round with Rout as with a fringe, and on it were Strife, and Strength, and Panic whose blood runs cold; moreover there was the head of the dread monster Gorgon,, grim and awful to behold, portent of aegis bearing Jove.
ild.05 There Juno stayed her Horses, and spoke to Jove the son of Saturn, lord of all.
ild.05 Father" Jove," said she, "are you not angry with Mars for these high doings? how great and goodly a host of the Achaeans he has destroyed to my great grief, and without either right or reason, while the Cyprian and Apollo are enjoying it all at their ease and setting this unrighteous madman on to do further mischief.
ild.05 I hope, Father Jove, that you will not be angry if I hit Mars hard, and chase him out of the battle.
ild.05 And Jove answered, "Set Minerva on to him, for she punishes him more often than any one else does.
ild.05 Diomed answered, "I know you, Goddess, daughter of aegis bearing Jove, and will hide nothing from you.
ild.05 I am only following your own instructions; you told me not to fight any of the blessed Gods; but if Jove s daughter Venus came into battle I was to wound her with my spear.
ild.05 With all speed he reached high Olympus, home of the Gods, and in great pain sat down beside Jove the son of Saturn.
ild.05 He showed Jove the immortal blood that was flowing from his wound, and spoke piteously, saying, Father" Jove, are you not angered by such doings? We Gods are continually suffering in the most cruel manner at one another s hands while helping mortals; and we all owe you a grudge for having begotten that mad termagant of a daughter, who is always committing outrage of some kind.
ild.05 Jove looked angrily at him and said, "Do not come whining here, Sir Facing bothways.
ild.05 Then Hebe washed him, and clothed him in goodly raiment, and he took his seat by his father Jove all glorious to behold.
ild.05 But Juno of Argos and Minerva of Alalcomene, now that they had put a stop to the murderous doings of Mars, went back again to the house of Jove.
ild.06 But Proetus devised his ruin, and being stronger than he, drove him from the land of the Argives, over which Jove had made him ruler.
ild.06 Jove, the lord of counsel, lay with Laodameia, and she bore him noble Sarpedon; but when Bellerophon came to be hated by all the gods, he wandered all desolate and dismayed upon the Alean plain, gnawing at his own heart, and shunning the path of man.
ild.06 She took his hand within her own and said, "My son, why have you left the battle to come hither? Are the Achaeans, woe betide them, pressing you hard about the city that you have thought fit to come and uplift your hands to Jove from the citadel? Wait till I can bring you wine that you may make offering to Jove and to the other immortals, and may then drink and be refreshed.
ild.06 I dare not make a drink offering to Jove with unwashed hands; one who is bespattered with blood and filth may not pray to the son of Saturn.
ild.06 Would that the earth might open her jaws and swallow him, for Jove bred him to be the bane of the Trojans, and of Priam and Priam s sons.
ild.06 The Women lifted up their hands to the Goddess with a loud cry, and Theano took the robe to lay it upon the knees of Minerva, praying the while to the daughter of great Jove.
ild.06 While they were thus praying to the daughter of great Jove, Hector went to the fair house of Alexandrus, which he had built for him by the foremost builders in the land.
ild.06 Still, brother, come in and rest upon this seat, for it is you who bear the brunt of that toil that has been caused by my hateful self and by the sin of Alexandrus both of whom Jove has doomed to be a theme of song among those that shall be born hereafter.
ild.06 He slew him, but did not for very shame despoil him; when he had burned him in his wondrous armour, he raised a barrow over his ashes and the mountain nymphs, daughters of aegis bearing Jove, planted a grove of elms about his tomb.
ild.06 Then he took his darling child, kissed him, and dandled him in his arms, praying over him the while to Jove and to all the Gods.
ild.06 Jove"," he cried, "grant that this my child may be even as myself, chief among the Trojans; let him be not less excellent in strength, and let him rule Ilius with his might.
ild.06 Let us be going, and we will make things right hereafter, should Jove vouchsafe us to set the cup of our deliverance before ever living Gods of heaven in our own homes, when we have chased the Achaeans from Troy.
ild.07 The pair met by the oak tree, and King Apollo son of Jove was first to speak.
ild.07 "What would you have said he, "daughter of great Jove, that your proud spirit has sent you hither from Olympus? Have you no pity upon the Trojans, and would you incline the scales of victory in favour of the Danaans? Let me persuade you for it will be better thus stay the combat for to day, but let them renew the fight hereafter till they compass the doom of Ilius, since you Goddesses have made up your minds to destroy the city.
ild.07 Apollo, son of Jove, replied, "Let us incite great Hector to challenge some one of the Danaans in single combat; on this the Achaeans will be shamed into finding a man who will fight him.
ild.07 But Minerva and Apollo, in the likeness of Vultures, perched on father Jove s high oak tree, proud of their men; and the ranks sat close ranged together, bristling with shield and helmet and spear.
ild.07 "Hear me, Trojans and Achaeans, that I may speak even as I am minded; Jove on his high throne has brought our oaths and covenants to nothing, and foreshadows ill for both of us, till you either take the towers of Troy, or are yourselves vanquished at your ships.
ild.07 Thus I say, and may Jove be witness between us.
ild.07 Would, by father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo, that I were still young and strong as when the Pylians and Arcadians were gathered in fight by the rapid river Celadon under the walls of Pheia, and round about the waters of the river Iardanus.
ild.07 Thus he spoke, and when each of them had marked his lot, and had thrown it into the helmet of Agamemnon son of Atreus, the people lifted their hands in prayer, and thus would one of them say as he looked into the vault of heaven, Father" Jove, grant that the lot fall on Ajax, or on the son of Tydeus, or upon the king of rich Mycene himself.
ild.07 I will put on my armour; meanwhile, pray to King Jove in silence among yourselves that the Trojans may not hear you or aloud if you will, for we fear no man.
ild.07 With this they fell praying to King Jove the son of Saturn, and thus would one of them say as he looked into the vault of heaven, Father" Jove that rulest from Ida, most glorious in power, vouchsafe victory to Ajax, and let him win great glory: but if you wish well to Hector also and would protect him, grant to each of them equal fame and prowess.
ild.07 When he was in full array he sprang forward as monstrous Mars when he takes part among men whom Jove has set fighting with one another even so did huge Ajax, bulwark of the Achaeans, spring forward with a grim smile on his face as he brandished his long spear and strode onward.
ild.07 Thereon they would have hacked at one another in close combat with their swords, had not heralds, messengers of Gods and men, come forward, one from the Trojans and the other from the Achaeans Talthybius and Idaeus both of them honourable men; these parted them with their staves, and the good herald Idaeus said, "My sons, fight no longer, you are both of you valiant, and both are dear to Jove; we know this; but night is now falling, and the behests of night may not be well gainsaid.
ild.07 When they reached the quarters of the son of Atreus, Agamemnon sacrificed for them a Five year old Bull in honour of Jove the son of Saturn.
ild.07 Let Jove the mighty husband of Juno be witness to this covenant.
ild.07 Thus did the Achaeans toil, and the Gods, seated by the side of Jove the lord of lightning, marvelled at their great work; but Neptune, lord of the earthquake, spoke, saying, Father" Jove, what mortal in the whole world will again take the Gods into his counsel? See you not how the Achaeans have built a wall about their ships and driven a trench all round it, without offering Hecatombs to the Gods? The The fame of this wall will reach as far as dawn itself, and men will no longer think anything of the one which Phoebus Apollo and myself built with so much labour for Laomedon.
ild.07 Jove was displeased and answered, "What, O shaker of the earth, are you talking about? A God less powerful than yourself might be alarmed at what they are doing, but your fame reaches as far as dawn itself.
ild.07 But all the time Jove boded them ill and roared with his portentous thunder.
ild.08 NOW when Morning, clad in her robe of saffron, had begun to suffuse light over the earth, Jove called the gods in council on the topmost crest of serrated Olympus.
ild.08 Hangs me a Golden chain from heaven, and lay hold of it all of you, Gods and Goddesses together tug as you will, you will not drag Jove the supreme counsellor from heaven to earth; but were I to pull at it myself I should draw you up with earth and sea into the bargain, then would I bind the chain about some pinnacle of Olympus and leave you all dangling in the mid firmament.
ild.08 Jove smiled at her and answered, "Take heart, my child, Trito born; I am not really in earnest, and I wish to be kind to you.
ild.08 Then he was afraid and said to Diomed, Son" of Tydeus, turn your Horses in flight; see you not that the hand of Jove is against you? To day he vouchsafes victory to Hector; to morrow, if it so please him, he will again grant it to ourselves; no man, however brave, may thwart the purpose of Jove, for he is far stronger than any.
ild.08 Thrice did he doubt, and thrice did Jove thunder from the heights of.
ild.08 Hector then shouted to them and said, Trojans", Lycians, and Dardanians, lovers of close fighting, be men, my friends, and fight with might and with main; I see that Jove is minded to vouchsafe victory and great glory to myself, while he will deal destruction upon the Danaans.
ild.08 If all of us who are with the Danaans were to drive the Trojans back and keep Jove from helping them, he would have to sit there sulking alone on Ida.
ild.08 King Neptune was greatly troubled and answered, Juno", rash of tongue, what are you talking about? We other gods must not set ourselves against Jove, for he is far stronger than we are.
ild.08 Thus did they converse; but the whole space enclosed by the ditch, from the ships even to the wall, was filled with Horses and warriors, who were pent up there by Hector son of Priam, now that the hand of Jove was with him.
ild.08 Father Jove, did you ever so ruin a great king and rob him so utterly of his greatness? yet, when to my sorrow I was coming hither, I never let my ship pass your altars without offering the fat and thigh bones of heifers upon every one of them, so eager was I to sack the city of Troy.
ild.08 Thus did he pray, and father Jove pitying his tears vouchsafed him that his people should live, not die; forthwith he sent them an Eagle, most unfailingly portentous of all birds, with a young fawn in its talons; the Eagle dropped the fawn by the altar on which the Achaeans sacrificed to Jove the lord of omens; When, therefore, the people saw that the bird had come from Jove, they sprang more fiercely upon the Trojans and fought more boldly.
ild.08 Cover him with glory though he is far off; I will promise and I will assuredly perform; if aegis bearing Jove and Minerva grant me to sack the city of Ilius, you shall have the next best meed of honour after my own a tripod, or two Horses with their Chariot, or a Woman who shall go up into your bed.
ild.08 Jove now again put heart into the Trojans, and they drove the Achaeans to their deep trench with Hector in all his glory at their head.
ild.08 Juno when she saw them had pity upon them, and at once said to Minerva, "Alas, child of aegis bearing Jove, shall you and I take no more thought for the dying Danaans, though it be the last time we ever do so? See how they perish and come to a bad end before the onset of but a single man.
ild.08 Minerva answered, "Would, indeed, this fellow might die in his own land, and fall by the hands of the Achaeans; but my father Jove is mad with spleen, ever foiling me, ever headstrong and unjust.
ild.08 He would weep till his cry came up to heaven, and then Jove would send me down to help him; if I had had the sense to foresee all this, when Eurystheus sent him to the house of Hades, to fetch the hell hound from Erebus, he would never have come back alive out of the deep waters of the river Styx.
ild.08 And now Jove hates me, while he lets Thetis have her way because she kissed his knees and took hold of his beard, when she was begging him to do honour to Achilles.
ild.08 Get our Horses ready, while I go within the house of aegis bearing Jove and put on my armour; we shall then find out whether Priam s son Hector will be glad to meet us in the highways of battle, or whether the Trojans will glut hounds and Vultures with the fat of their flesh as they he dead by the ships of the Achaeans.
ild.08 Thus did she speak and white armed Juno, daughter of great Saturn, obeyed her words; she set about harnessing her Gold bedizened steeds, while Minerva daughter of aegis bearing Jove flung her richly vesture, made with her own hands, on to the threshold of her father, and donned the shirt of Jove, arming herself for battle.
ild.08 But father Jove when he saw them from Ida was very angry, and sent winged Iris with a message to them.
ild.08 He is less hurt and angry with Juno, for whatever he says she always contradicts him but you, bold bold hussy, will you really dare to raise your huge spear in defiance of Jove?"
ild.08 With this she left them, and Juno said to Minerva, "Of a truth, child of aegis bearing Jove, I am not for fighting men s battles further in defiance of Jove.
ild.08 Let them live or die as luck will have it, and let Jove mete out his judgements upon the Trojans and Danaans according to his own pleasure.
ild.08 Presently father Jove drove his Chariot to Olympus, and entered the assembly of Gods.
ild.08 Jove then sat down upon his Golden throne and Olympus reeled beneath him.
ild.08 Minerva and Juno sat alone, apart from Jove, and neither spoke nor asked him questions, but Jove knew what they meant, and said, Minerva" and Juno, why are you so angry? Are you fatigued with killing so many of your dear friends the Trojans? Be this as it may, such is the might of my hands that all the Gods in Olympus cannot turn me; you were both of you trembling all over ere ever you saw the fight and its terrible doings.
ild.08 And Jove answered, "To morrow morning, Juno, if you choose to do so, you will see the son of Saturn destroying large numbers of the Argives, for fierce Hector shall not cease fighting till he has roused the son of Peleus when they are fighting in dire straits at their ships sterns about the body of Patroclus.
ild.08 I pray in hope to Jove and to the gods that we may then drive those fate sped hounds from our land, for tis the fates that have borne them and their ships hither.
ild.09 Cruel Jove gave me his solemn promise that I should sack the city of Troy before returning, but he has played me false, and is now bidding me go ingloriously back to Argos with the loss of much people.
ild.09 Such is the will of Jove, who has laid many a proud city in the dust as he will yet lay others, for his power is above all.
ild.09 Jove, moreover, has vouchsafed you to wield the sceptre and to uphold righteousness, that you may take thought for your people under you; therefore it behooves you above all others both to speak and to give ear, and to out the counsel of another who shall have been minded to speak wisely.
ild.09 One whom heaven befriends is in himself a host, and Jove has shown that he befriends this man by destroying much people of the Achaeans.
ild.09 Let Phoenix, dear to Jove, lead the way; let Ajax and Ulysses follow, and let the heralds Odius and Eurybates go with them.
ild.09 Now bring water for our hands, and bid all keep silence while we pray to Jove the son of Saturn, if so be that he may have mercy upon us.
ild.09 Jove, moreover, has sent his lightnings on their right; Hector, in all his glory, rages like a maniac; confident that Jove is with him he fears neither God nor man, but is gone raving mad, and prays for the approach of day.
ild.09 Once he stayed to meet me and hardly did he escape my onset: now, however, since I am in no mood to fight him, I will to morrow offer sacrifice to Jove and to all the Gods; I will draw my ships into the water and then victual them duly; to morrow morning, if you care to look, you will see my ships on the Hellespont, and my men rowing out to sea with might and main.
ild.09 He has wronged me and deceived me enough, he shall not cozen me further; let him go his own way, for Jove has robbed him of his reason.
ild.09 Jove has held his hand over her to protect her, and her people have taken heart.
ild.09 He prayed that no son of mine might ever sit upon knees and the Gods, Jove of the world below and awful Proserpine, fulfilled his curse.
ild.09 For prayers are as daughters to great Jove; halt, wrinkled, with eyes askance, they follow in the footsteps of sin, who, being fierce and fleet of foot, leaves them far behind him, and ever baneful to mankind outstrips them even to the ends of the world; but nevertheless the prayers come hobbling and healing after.
ild.09 If a man has pity upon these daughters of Jove when they draw near him, they will bless him and hear him too when he is praying; but if he deny them and will not listen to them, they go to Jove the son of Saturn and pray that he may presently fall into sin to his ruing bitterly hereafter.
ild.09 Therefore, Achilles, give these daughters of Jove due reverence, and bow before them as all good men will bow.
ild.09 The other Gods had all been feasted with Hecatombs, but to the daughter of great Jove alone he had made no sacrifice.
ild.09 I have honour from Jove himself, which will abide with me at my ships while I have breath in my body, and my limbs are strong.
ild.09 Jove, he said, has laid his hand over the city to protect it, and the people have taken heart.
ild.10 When he looked upon the plain of Troy he marvelled at the many watchfires burning in front of Ilius, and at the sound of pipes and flutes and of the hum of men, but when presently he turned towards the ships and hosts of the Achaeans, he tore his hair by handfuls before Jove on high, and groaned aloud for the very disquietness of his soul.
ild.10 And King Agamemnon answered, Menelaus", we both of us need shrewd counsel to save the Argives and our ships, for Jove has changed his mind, and inclines towards Hector s sacrifices rather than ours.
ild.10 Call every man on your way, and bid him be stirring; name him by his lineage and by his father s name, give each all titular observance, and stand not too much upon your own dignity; we must take our full share of toil, for at our birth Jove laid this heavy burden upon us.
ild.10 And Agamemnon answered, Nestor", son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, it is I, Agamemnon son of Atreus, on whom Jove has laid labour and sorrow so long as there is breath in my body and my limbs carry me.
ild.10 Nestor replied, "Most noble son of Atreus, king of men, Agamemnon, Jove will not do all for Hector that Hector thinks he will; he will have troubles yet in plenty if Achilles will lay aside his anger.
ild.10 First they went to Diomed son of Tydeus, and found him outside his tent clad in his armour with his comrades sleeping round him and using their shields as pillows; as for their spears, they stood upright on the spikes of their butts that were driven into the ground, and the burnished Bronze flashed afar like the lightning of father Jove.
ild.10 Ulysses was glad when he heard it and prayed to Minerva: "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of aegis bearing Jove, you who spy out all my ways and who are with me in all my hardships; befriend me in this mine hour, and grant that we may return to the ships covered with glory after having achieved some mighty exploit that shall bring sorrow to the Trojans.
ild.10 Then Diomed of the loud war cry also prayed: "Hear me too," said he, "daughter of Jove, unweariable; be with me even as you were with my noble father Tydeus when he went to Thebes as envoy sent by the Achaeans.
ild.10 When they had done praying to the daughter of great Jove, they went their way like two Lions prowling by night amid the armour and blood stained bodies of them that had fallen.
ild.10 When he had done speaking Hector held up his sceptre, and swore him his oath saying, "May Jove the thundering husband of Juno bear witness that no other Trojan but yourself shall mount those steeds, and that you shall have your will with them for ever.
ild.10 Surely some God must have met you and given them to you, for you are both of dear to Jove, and to Jove s daughter Minerva.
ild.11 AND now as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus, harbinger of light alike to mortals and immortals, Jove sent fierce Discord with the ensign of war in her hands to the ships of the Achaeans.
ild.11 Hector s round shield showed in the front rank, and as some baneful star that shines for a moment through a rent in the clouds and is again hidden beneath them; even so was Hector now seen in the front ranks and now again in the hindermost, and his Bronze armour gleamed like the lightning of aegis bearing Jove.
ild.11 All of them blamed the son of Saturn for wanting to Live victory to the Trojans, but father Jove heeded them not: he held aloof from all, and sat apart in his all glorious majesty, looking down upon the city of the Trojans, the ships of the Achaeans, the gleam of Bronze, and alike upon the slayers and on the slain.
ild.11 Jove drew Hector away from the darts and dust, with the carnage and din of battle; but the son of Atreus sped onwards, calling out lustily to the Danaans.
ild.11 Then she said, Hector" son of Priam, peer of Gods in counsel, father Jove has sent me to bear you this message so long as you see Agamemnon heading his men and making havoc of the Trojan ranks, you are to keep aloof and bid the others bear the brunt of the battle, but when Agamemnon is wounded either by spear or arrow, and takes to his Chariot, then will Jove vouchsafe you strength to slay till you reach the ships, and till night falls at the going down of the sun.
ild.11 With a loud clear voice he shouted to the Danaans, "My friends, princes and counsellors of the Argives, defend the ships yourselves, for Jove has not suffered me to fight the whole day through against the Trojans.
ild.11 When Hector saw Agamemnon quit the field, he shouted to the Trojans and Lycians saying, Trojans", Lycians, and Dardanian warriors, be men, my friends, and acquit yourselves in battle bravely; their best man has left them, and Jove has vouchsafed me a great triumph; charge the foe with your Chariots that.
ild.11 What, then is the full tale of those whom Hector son of Priam killed in the hour of triumph which Jove then vouchsafed him? First Asaeus, Autonous, and Opites; Dolops son of Clytius, Opheltius and Agelaus; Aesymnus, Orus and Hipponous steadfast in battle; these chieftains of the Achaeans did Hector slay, and then he fell upon the rank and file.
ild.11 And Diomed answered, "Come what may, I will stand firm; but we shall have scant joy of it, for Jove is minded to give victory to the Trojans rather than to us.
ild.11 Hector tore his way through and flung himself into the thick of the fight, and his presence threw the Danaans into confusion, for his spear was not long idle; nevertheless though he went among the ranks with sword and spear, and throwing great stones, he avoided Ajax son of Telamon, for Jove would have been angry with him if he had fought a better man than himself.
ild.11 Then father Jove from his high throne struck fear into the heart of Ajax, so that he stood there dazed and threw his shield behind him looking fearfully at the throng of his foes as though he were some wild beast, and turning hither and thither but crouching slowly backwards.
ild.11 Thence in full panoply and equipment we came towards noon to the sacred waters of the Alpheus, and there we offered victims to almighty Jove, with a Bull to Alpheus, another to Neptune, and a herd heifer to Minerva.
ild.11 When the sun s rays began to fall upon the earth we joined battle, praying to Jove and to Minerva, and when the fight had begun, I was the first to kill my man and take his Horses to wit the warrior Mulius.
ild.11 Thereon Jove vouchsafed the Pylians a great victory, for we chased them far over the plain, killing the men and bringing in their armour, till we had brought our Horses to Buprasium rich in wheat and to the Olenian rock, with the hill that is called Alision, at which point Minerva turned the people back.
ild.11 There I slew the last man and left him; then the Achaeans drove their Horses back from Buprasium to Pylos and gave thanks to Jove among the Gods, and among mortal men to Nestor.
ild.11 The old knight Peleus was in the outer court, roasting the fat thigh bones of a heifer to Jove the lord of thunder; and he held a Gold chalice in his hand from which he poured drink offerings of wine over the burning sacrifice.
ild.11 If, however, he is fearful about some oracle, or if his mother has told him something from Jove, then let him send you, and let the rest of the Myrmidons follow with you, if perchance you may bring light and saving to the Danaans.
ild.12 Phoebus Apollo turned the mouths of all these rivers together and made them flow for Nine days against the wall, while Jove rained the whole time that he might wash it sooner into the sea.
ild.12 The Argives, cowed by the scourge of Jove, were hemmed in at their ships in fear of Hector the mighty minister of Rout, who as heretofore fought with the force and fury of a whirlwind.
ild.12 If, indeed, great Jove is minded to help the Trojans, and in his anger will utterly destroy the Achaeans, I would myself gladly see them perish now and here far from Argos; but if they should rally and we are driven back from the ships pell mell into the trench there will be not so much as a man get back to the city to tell the tale.
ild.12 Father" Jove," he cried, "of a truth you too are altogether given to lying.
ild.12 He spoke, but moved not the mind of Jove, whose counsel it then was to give glory to Hector.
ild.12 The Trojans were struck with terror when they saw the snake, portent of aegis bearing Jove, writhing in the midst of them, and Polydamas went up to Hector and said, Hector", at our councils of war you are ever given to rebuke me, even when I speak wisely, as though it were not well, forsooth, that one of the people should cross your will either in the field or at the council board; you would have them support you always: nevertheless I will say what I think will be best; let us not now go on to fight the Danaans at their ships, for I know what will happen if this soaring Eagle which skirted the left wing of our with a monstrous blood red snake in its talons (the snake being still alive) was really sent as an omen to the Trojans on their essaying to cross the trench.
ild.12 You would have me pay no heed to the counsels of Jove, nor to the promises he made me and he bowed his head in confirmation; you bid me be ruled rather by the flight of wild fowl.
ild.12 What care I whether they fly towards dawn or dark, and whether they be on my right hand or on my left? Let us put our trust rather in the counsel of great Jove, king of mortals and immortals.
ild.12 Then Jove the lord of thunder sent the blast of a mighty wind from the mountains of Ida, that bore the dust down towards the ships; he thus lulled the Achaeans into security, and gave victory to Hector and to the Trojans, who, trusting to their own might and to the signs he had shown them, essayed to break through the great wall of the Achaeans.
ild.12 See that you none of you turn in flight towards the ships, daunted by the shouting of the foe, but press forward and keep one another in heart, if it may so be that Olympian Jove the lord of lightning will vouchsafe us to repel our foes, and drive them back towards the city.
ild.12 As the flakes that fall thick upon a winter s day, when Jove is minded to snow and to display these his arrows to mankind he lulls the wind to rest, and snows hour after hour till he has buried the tops of the high mountains, the headlands that jut into the sea, the grassy plains, and the tilled fields of men; the snow lies deep upon the forelands, and havens of the grey sea, but the waves as they come rolling in stay it that it can come no further, though all else is wrapped as with a mantle so heavy are the heavens with snow even thus thickly did the stones fall on one side and on the other, some thrown at the Trojans, and some by the Trojans at the Achaeans; and the whole wall was in an uproar.
ild.12 Still the Trojans and brave Hector would not yet have broken down the gates and the great bar, had not Jove turned his son Sarpedon against the Argives as a Lion against a herd of horned Cattle.
ild.12 Teucer hit him with an arrow on the band that bore the shield which covered his body, but Jove saved his son from destruction that he might not fall by the ships sterns.
ild.12 But even so the Trojans could not rout the Achaeans, who still held on; and as some honest hard working Woman weighs wool in her balance and sees that the scales be true, for she would gain some pitiful earnings for her little ones, even so was the fight balanced evenly between them till the time came when Jove gave the greater glory to Hector son of Priam, who was first to spring towards the wall of the Achaeans.
ild.13 NOW when Jove had thus brought Hector and the Trojans to the ships, he left them to their never ending toil, and turned his keen eyes away, looking elsewhither towards the Horse breeders of Thrace, the Mysians, fighters at close quarters, the noble Hippemolgi, who live on milk, and the Abians, justest of mankind.
ild.13 He had come from under the sea and taken his place here, for he pitied the Achaeans who were being overcome by the Trojans; and he was furiously angry with Jove.
ild.13 I am not afraid that the Trojans, who have got over the wall in force, will be victorious in any other part, for the Achaeans can hold all of them in check, but I much fear that some evil will befall us here where furious Hector, who boasts himself the son of great Jove himself, is leading them on like a pillar of flame.
ild.13 In this case you will drive him from the ships even though he be inspired by Jove himself.
ild.13 None are held back neither by fear nor slackness, but it seems to be the of almighty Jove that the Achaeans should perish ingloriously here far from Argos: you, Thoas, have been always staunch, and you keep others in heart if you see any fail in duty; be not then remiss now, but exhort all to do their utmost.
ild.13 Jove was minded to give victory to the Trojans and to Hector, so as to do honour to fleet Achilles, nevertheless he did not mean to utterly overthrow the Achaean host before Ilius, and only wanted to glorify Thetis and her valiant son.
ild.13 Neptune on the other hand went about among the Argives to incite them, having come up from the grey sea in secret, for he was grieved at seeing them vanquished by the Trojans, and was furiously angry with Jove.
ild.13 Both were of the same race and country, but Jove was elder born and knew more, therefore Neptune feared to defend the Argives openly, but in the likeness of man, he kept on encouraging them throughout their host.
ild.13 Idomeneus vaunted over him and cried with a loud voice saying, Deiphobus", since you are in a mood to vaunt, shall we cry quits now that we have killed three men to your one? Nay, sir, stand in fight with me yourself, that you may learn what manner of Jove begotten man am I that have come hither.
ild.13 Jove first begot Minos chief ruler in Crete, and Minos in his turn begot a son, noble Deucalion; Deucalion begot me to be a ruler over many men in Crete, and my ships have now brought me hither, to be the bane of yourself, your father, and the Trojans.
ild.13 Grim Mars of awful voice did not yet know that his son had fallen, for he was sitting on the summits of Olympus under the Golden clouds, by command of Jove, where the other Gods were also sitting, forbidden to take part in the battle.
ild.13 Cowardly she Wolves that you are, you feared not the anger of dread Jove, avenger of violated hospitality, who will one day destroy your city; you stole my wedded wife and wickedly carried off much treasure when you were her guest, and now you would fling fire upon our ships, and kill our heroes.
ild.13 O father Jove, you, who they say art above all both Gods and men in wisdom, and from whom all things that befall us do proceed, how can you thus favour the Trojans men so proud and overweening, that they are never tired of fighting? All things pall after a while sleep, love, sweet song, and stately dance still these are things of which a man would surely have his fill rather than of battle, whereas it is of battle that the Trojans are insatiate.
ild.13 Heaven has made one man an excellent soldier; of another it has made a dancer or a singer and player on the lyre; while yet in another Jove has implanted a wise understanding of which men reap fruit to the saving of many, and he himself knows more about it than any one; therefore I will say what I think will be best.
ild.13 Then Jove urged them on to fight.
ild.13 Sir"," he cried, "draw near; why do you think thus vainly to dismay the Argives? We Achaeans are excellent soldiers, but the scourge of Jove has fallen heavily upon us.
ild.13 The time is near when you shall pray Jove and all the Gods in your flight, that your steeds may be swifter than hawks as they raise the dust on the plain and bear you back to your city.
ild.13 But Hector answered, Ajax", braggart and false of tongue, would that I were as sure of being son for evermore to Aegis bearing Jove, with Queen Juno for my mother, and of being held in like honour with Minerva and Apollo, as I am that this day is big with the destruction of the Achaeans; and you shall fall among them if you dare abide my spear; it shall rend your fair body and bid you glut our hounds and birds of prey with your fat and your flesh, as you fall by the ships of the Achaeans.
ild.13 The Argives on their part raised a shout likewise, nor did they forget their prowess, but stood firm against the onslaught of the Trojan chieftains, and the cry from both the hosts rose up to heaven and to the brightness of Jove s presence.
ild.14 Then Nestor knight of Gerene answered, "It is indeed as you say; it is all coming true at this moment, and even Jove who thunders from on high cannot prevent it.
ild.14 And King Agamemnon answered, Nestor", if the Trojans are indeed fighting at the rear of our ships, and neither the wall nor the trench has served us over which the Danaans toiled so hard, and which they deemed would be an impregnable bulwark both for us and our fleet I see it must be the will of Jove that the Achaeans should perish ingloriously here, far from Argos.
ild.14 I knew when Jove was willing to defend us, and I know now that he is raising the Trojans to like honour with the Gods, while us, on the other hand, he bas bound hand and foot.
ild.14 Ulysses looked fiercely at him and said, Son" of Atreus, what are you talking about? Wretch, you should have commanded some other and baser army, and not been ruler over us to whom Jove has allotted a life of hard fighting from youth to old age, till we every one of us perish.
ild.14 Oeeneus remained in his own country, but my father (as Jove and the other Gods ordained it) migrated to Argos.
ild.14 Then she turned her eyes to Jove as he sat on the topmost crests of many fountained Ida, and loathed him.
ild.14 She set herself to think how she might hoodwink him, and in the end she deemed that it would be best for her to go to Ida and array herself in rich attire, in the hope that Jove might become enamoured of her, and wish to embrace her.
ild.14 She cleansed all the dirt from her fair body with ambrosia, then she anointed herself with Olive oil, ambrosial, very soft, and scented specially for herself if it were so much as shaken in the Bronze floored house of Jove, the scent pervaded the universe of heaven and earth.
ild.14 Jove s daughter Venus answered, Juno", august queen of Goddesses, daughter of mighty Saturn, say what you want, and I will do it for at once, if I can, and if it can be done at all.
ild.14 I am going to the world s end to visit Oceanus (from whom all we Gods proceed) and mother Tethys: they received me in their house, took care of me, and brought me up, having taken me over from Rhaea when Jove imprisoned great Saturn in the depths that are under earth and sea.
ild.14 Thereon laughter loving Venus said, "I cannot and must not refuse you, for you sleep in the arms of Jove who is our king.
ild.14 Venus now went back into the house of Jove, while Juno darted down from the summits of Olympus.
ild.14 Close Jove s keen eyes for me in slumber while I hold him clasped in my embrace, and I will give you a beautiful golden seat, that can never fall to pieces; my clubfooted son Vulcan shall make it for you, and he shall give it a footstool for you to rest your fair feet upon when you are at table.
ild.14 Then Sleep answered, Juno", great queen of Goddesses, daughter of mighty Saturn, I would lull any other of the gods to sleep without compunction, not even excepting the waters of Oceanus from whom all of them proceed, but I dare not go near Jove, nor send him to sleep unless he bids me.
ild.14 I have had one lesson already through doing what you asked me, on the day when Jove s mighty son Hercules set sail from Ilius after having sacked the city of the Trojans.
ild.14 At your bidding I suffused my sweet self over the mind of aegis bearing Jove, and laid him to rest; meanwhile you hatched a plot against Hercules, and set the blasts of the angry winds beating upon the sea, till you took him to the goodly city of Cos away from all his friends.
ild.14 Jove was furious when he awoke, and began hurling the Gods about all over the house; he was looking more particularly for myself, and would have flung me down through space into the sea where I should never have been heard of any more, had not Night who cows both men and Gods protected me.
ild.14 I fled to her and Jove left off looking for me in spite of his being so angry, for he did not dare do anything to displease Night.
ild.14 And Juno said, "Sleep, why do you take such notions as those into your head? Do you think Jove will be as anxious to help the Trojans, as he was about his own son? Come, I will marry you to one of the youngest of the Graces, and she shall be your own Pasithea, whom you have always wanted to marry.
ild.14 Here Sleep halted, and ere Jove caught sight of him he climbed a lofty pine tree the tallest that reared its head towards heaven on all Ida.
ild.14 Juno then went to Gargarus, the topmost peak of Ida, and Jove, driver of the clouds, set eyes upon her.
ild.14 And Jove said, Juno", you can choose some other time for paying your visit to Oceanus for the present let us devote ourselves to love and to the enjoyment of one another.
ild.14 And Jove answered, Juno", you need not be afraid that either God or man will see you, for I will enshroud both of us in such a dense Golden cloud, that the very sun for all his bright piercing beams shall not see through it.
ild.14 When he had found him he said, "Now, Neptune, you can help the Danaans with a will, and give them victory though it be only for a short time while Jove is still sleeping.
ild.14 As an oak falls headlong when uprooted by the lightning flash of father Jove, and there is a terrible smell of brimstone no man can help being dismayed if he is standing near it, for a thunderbolt is a very awful thing even so did Hector fall to earth and bite the dust.
ild.14 When they reached the ford of the air stream of Xanthus, begotten of Immortal Jove, they took him from off his Chariot and laid him down on the ground; they poured water over him, and as they did so he breathed again and opened his eyes.
ild.14 Ajax son of Oileus killed more than any other, for there was no man so fleet as he to pursue flying foes when Jove had spread panic among them.
ild.15 Jove now woke on the crests of Ida, where he was lying with Golden throned Juno by his side, and starting to his feet he saw the Trojans and Achaeans, the one thrown into confusion, and the others driving them pell mell before them with King Neptune in their midst.
ild.15 Swift as the thought of one whose fancy carries him over vast continents, and he says to himself, "Now I will be here, or there," and he would have all manner of things even so swiftly did Juno wing her way till she came to high Olympus and went in among the Gods who were gathered in the house of Jove.
ild.15 On this Juno sat down, and the Gods were troubled throughout the house of Jove.
ild.15 Fools" that we are," she cried, "to be thus madly angry with Jove; we keep on wanting to go up to him and stay him by force or by persuasion, but he sits aloof and cares for nobody, for he knows that he is much stronger than any other of the immortals.
ild.15 When he heard this Mars smote his two sturdy thighs with the flat of his hands, and said in anger, "Do not blame me, you Gods that dwell in heaven, if I go to the ships of the Achaeans and avenge the death of my son, even though it end in my being struck by Jove s lightning and lying in blood and dust among the corpses.
ild.15 On this, Jove would have been roused to still more fierce and implacable enmity against the other immortals, had not Minerva, ararmed for the safety of the Gods, sprung from her seat and hurried outside.
ild.15 She tore the helmet from his head and the shield from his shoulders, and she took the Bronze spear from his strong hand and set it on one side; then she said to Mars, Madman", you are undone; you have ears that hear not, or you have lost all judgement and understanding; have you not heard what Juno has said on coming straight from the presence of Olympian Jove? Do you wish to go through all kinds of suffering before you are brought back sick and sorry to Olympus, after having caused infinite mischief to all us others? Jove would instantly leave the Trojans and Achaeans to themselves; he would come to Olympus to punish us, and would grip us up one after another, guilty or not guilty.
ild.15 Jove"," she said to them, "desires you to go to him at once on Mt.
ild.15 When they reached many fountained Ida, mother of wild beasts, they found Jove seated on topmost Gargarus with a fragrant cloud encircling his head as with a diadem.
ild.15 Then she said, "I have come, O dark haired king that holds the world in his embrace, to bring you a message from Jove.
ild.15 Neptune was very angry and said, "Great heavens! strong as Jove may be, he has said more than he can do if he has threatened violence against me, who am of like honour with himself.
ild.15 We were three brothers whom Rhea bore to Saturn Jove, myself, and Hades who rules the world below.
ild.15 When we cast lots, it fell to me to have my dwelling in the sea for evermore; Hades took the darkness of the realms under the earth, while air and sky and clouds were the portion that fell to Jove; but earth and great Olympus are the common property of all.
ild.15 Therefore I will not walk as Jove would have me.
ild.15 Iris fleet as the wind then answered, "Am I really, Neptune, to take this daring and unyielding message to Jove, or will you reconsider your answer? Sensible people are open to argument, and you know that the Erinyes always range themselves on the side of the older person.
ild.15 Now, however, I will give way in spite of my displeasure; furthermore let me tell you, and I mean what I say if contrary to the desire of myself, Minerva driver of the spoil, Juno, Mercury, and King Vulcan, Jove spares steep Ilius, and will not let the Achaeans have the great triumph of sacking it, let him understand that he will incur our implacable resentment.
ild.15 Then Jove said to Apollo, "Go, dear Phoebus, to Hector, for Neptune who holds the earth in his embrace has now gone down under the sea to avoid the severity of my displeasure.
ild.15 He knew those who were about him, and the sweat and hard breathing had left him from the moment when the will of aegis bearing Jove had revived him.
ild.15 He has killed many of us Danaans already, and I take it will yet do so, for the hand of Jove must be with him or he would never dare show himself so masterful in the forefront of the battle.
ild.15 He bore aloft the terrible aegis with its shaggy fringe, which Vulcan the smith had given Jove to strike terror into the hearts of men.
ild.15 Father" Jove," said he, "if ever any one in wheat growing Argos burned you fat thigh bones of Sheep or heifer and prayed that he might return safely home, whereon you bowed your head to him in assent, bear it in mind now, and suffer not the Trojans to triumph thus over the Achaeans.
ild.15 All counselling Jove thundered loudly in answer to die prayer of the aged son of Neleus.
ild.15 When the heard Jove thunder they flung themselves yet more fiercely on the Achaeans.
ild.15 Teucer then aimed another arrow at Hector, and there would have been no more fighting at the ships if he had hit him and killed him then and there: Jove, however, who kept watch over Hector, had his eyes on Teucer, and deprived him of his triumph, by breaking his bowstring for him just as he was drawing it and about to take his aim; on this the arrow went astray and the bow fell from his hands.
ild.15 Ajax son of Telamon answered, "My good fellow, let your bow and your arrows be, for Jove has made them useless in order to spite the Danaans.
ild.15 When Hector saw that Teucer s bow was of no more use to him, he shouted out to the Trojans and Lycians, Trojans", Lycians, and Dardanians good in close fight, be men, my friends, and show your mettle here at the ships, for I see the weapon of one of their chieftains made useless by the hand of Jove.
ild.15 It is easy to see when Jove is helping people and means to help them still further, or again when he is bringing them down and will do nothing for them; he is now on our side, and is going against the Argives.
ild.15 They laid his words to heart and hedged the ships as with a wall of Bronze, while Jove urged on the Trojans.
ild.15 The Trojans, fierce as Lions, were still rushing on towards the ships in fulfilment of the behests of Jove who kept spurring them on to new deeds of daring, while he deadened the courage of the Argives and defeated them by encouraging the Trojans.
ild.15 For he meant giving glory to Hector son of Priam, and letting him throw fire upon the ships, till he had fulfilled the unrighteous prayer that Thetis had made him; Jove, therefore, bided his time till he should see the glare of a blazing ship.
ild.15 Jove from heaven was with him, and though he was but one against many, vouchsafed him victory and glory; for he was doomed to an early death, and already Pallas Minerva was hurrying on the hour of his destruction at the hands of the son of Peleus.
ild.15 Or as a savage Lion attacking a herd of cows while they are feeding by thousands in the low lying meadows by some wide watered shore the herdsman is at his wit s end how to protect his herd and keeps going about now in the van and now in the rear of his Cattle, while the Lion springs into the thick of them and fastens on a Cow so that they all tremble for fear even so were the Achaeans utterly panic stricken by Hector and father Jove.
ild.15 He kept on shouting his orders to the Danaans and exhorting them to defend their ships and tents; neither did Hector remain within the main body of the Trojan warriors, but as a dun Eagle swoops down upon a flock of wild fowl feeding near a river geese, it may be, or cranes, or long necked swans even so did Hector make straight for a dark prowed ship, rushing right towards it; for Jove with his mighty hand impelled him forward, and roused his people to follow him.
ild.15 Now has Jove vouchsafed us a day that will pay us for all the rest; this day we shall take the ships which came hither against heaven s will, and which have caused us such infinite suffering through the cowardice of our councillors, who when I would have done battle at the ships held me back and forbade the host to follow me; if Jove did then indeed warp our judgements, himself now commands me and cheers me on.
ild.16 If however you are kept back through knowledge of some oracle, or if your mother Thetis has told you something from the mouth of Jove, at least send me and the Myrmidons with me, if I may bring deliverance to the Danaans.
ild.16 Achilles was deeply moved and answered, "What, noble Patroclus, are you saying? I know no prophesyings which I am heeding, nor has my mother told me anything from the mouth of Jove, but I am cut to the very heart that one of my own rank should dare to rob me because he is more powerful than I am.
ild.16 Would, by father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo, that not a single man of all the Trojans might be left alive, nor yet of the Argives, but that we two might be alone left to tear aside the mantle that veils the brow of Troy.
ild.16 But Ajax could no longer hold his ground for the shower of darts that rained upon him; the will of Jove and the javelins of the Trojans were too much for him; the helmet that gleamed about his temples rang with the continuous clatter of the missiles that kept pouring on to it and on to the cheek pieces that protected his face.
ild.16 Ajax knew the hand of heaven in this, and was dismayed at seeing that Jove had now left him utterly defenceless and was willing victory for the Trojans.
ild.16 In this chest he had a cup of rare workmanship, from which no man but himself might drink, nor would he make offering from it to any other God save only to father Jove.
ild.16 Then he stood in the middle of the court and prayed, looking towards heaven, and making his drink offering of wine; nor was he unseen of Jove whose joy is in thunder.
ild.16 King" Jove," he cried, "lord of Dodona, God of the Pelasgi, who dwellest afar, you who hold wintry Dodona in your sway, where your prophets the Selli dwell around you with their feet unwashed and their couches made upon the ground if you heard me when I prayed to you aforetime, and did me honour while you sent disaster on the Achaeans, vouchsafe me now the fulfilment of yet this further prayer.
ild.16 Grant, O all seeing Jove, that victory may go with him; put your courage into his heart that Hector may learn whether my squire is man enough to fight alone, or whether his might is only then so indomitable when I myself enter the turmoil of war.
ild.16 Thus did he pray, and all counselling Jove heard his prayer.
ild.16 As when Jove, gatherer of the thunder cloud, spreads a dense canopy on the top of some lofty mountain, and all the peaks, the jutting headlands, and forest glades show out in the great light that flashes from the bursting heavens, even so when the Danaans had now driven back the fire from their ships, they took breath for a little while; but the fury of the fight was not yet over, for the Trojans were not driven back in utter rout, but still gave battle, and were ousted from their ground only by sheer fighting.
ild.16 As when a cloud goes up into heaven from Olympus, rising out of a clear sky when Jove is brewing a gale even with such panic stricken rout did the Trojans now fly, and there was no order in their going.
ild.16 As the whole dark earth bows before some tempest on an autumn day when Jove rains his hardest to punish men for giving crooked judgement in their courts, and arriving justice therefrom without heed to the decrees of heaven all the rivers run full and the torrents tear many a new channel as they roar headlong from the mountains to the dark sea, and it fares ill with the works of men even such was the stress and strain of the Trojan Horses in their flight.
ild.16 I have a grievous wound; my hand is aching with pain, there is no staunching the blood, and my whole arm drags by reason of my hurt, so that I cannot grasp my sword nor go among my foes and fight them, thou our prince, Jove s son Sarpedon, is slain.
ild.16 Jove defended not his son, do you, therefore, O king, heal me of my wound, ease my pain and grant me strength both to cheer on the Lycians and to fight along with them round the body of him who has fallen.
ild.16 Mighty was the din of their armour as they came together, and Jove shed a thick darkness over the fight, to increase the of the battle over the body of his son.
ild.16 Meriones then killed a helmed warrior of the Trojans, Laogonus son of Onetor, who was priest of Jove of Mt.
ild.16 Men swarmed about the body, as flies that buzz round the full milk pails in spring when they are brimming with milk even so did they gather round Sarpedon; nor did Jove turn his keen eyes away for one moment from the fight, but kept looking at it all the time, for he was settling how best to kill Patroclus, and considering whether Hector should be allowed to end him now in the fight round the body of Sarpedon, and strip him of his armour, or whether he should let him give yet further trouble to the Trojans.
ild.16 First, therefore, he made Hector turn fainthearted, whereon he mounted his Chariot and fled, bidding the other Trojans fly also, for he saw that the scales of Jove had turned against him.
ild.16 Then Jove lord of the storm cloud said to Apollo, "Dear Phoebus, go, I pray you, and take Sarpedon out of range of the weapons; cleanse the black blood from off him, and then bear him a long way off where you may wash him in the river, anoint him with ambrosia, and clothe him in immortal raiment; this done, commit him to the arms of the two fleet messengers, Death, and Sleep, who will carry him straightway to the rich land of Lycia, where his brothers and kinsmen will inter him, and will raise both mound and pillar to his memory, in due honour to the dead.
ild.16 Had he but obeyed the bidding of the son of Peleus, he would have, escaped death and have been scatheless; but the counsels of Jove pass man s understanding; he will put even a brave man to flight and snatch victory from his grasp, or again he will set him on to fight, as he now did when he put a high spirit into the heart of Patroclus.
ild.16 As he was thus doubting Phoebus Apollo drew near him in the likeness of a young and lusty warrior Asius, who was Hector s uncle, being own brother to Hecuba, and son of Dymas who lived in Phrygia by the waters of the river Sangarius; in his likeness Jove s son Apollo now spoke to Hector saying, Hector", why have you left off fighting? It is ill done of you.
ild.16 Then, as the life ebbed out of you, you answered, O knight Patroclus: Hector", vaunt as you will, for Jove the son of Saturn and Apollo have vouchsafed you victory; it is they who have vanquished me so easily, and they who have stripped the armour from my shoulders; had Twenty such men as you attacked me, all of them would have fallen before my spear.
ild.17 To this Menelaus answered in great anger "By father Jove, boasting is an ill thing.
ild.17 Menelaus then took aim, praying to father Jove as he did so; Euphorbus was drawing back, and Menelaus struck him about the roots of his throat, leaning his whole weight on the spear, so as to drive it home.
ild.17 I fear neither battle nor the din of Chariots, but Jove s will is stronger than ours; Jove at one time makes even a strong man draw back and snatches victory from his grasp, while at another he will set him on to fight.
ild.17 When Jove, lord of the storm cloud, saw Hector standing aloof and arming himself in the armour of the son of Peleus, he wagged his head and muttered to himself saying, "A! poor wretch, you arm in the armour of a hero, before whom many another trembles, and you reck nothing of the doom that is already close upon you.
ild.17 "My friends," he cried, "princes and counsellors of the Argives, all you who with Agamemnon and Menelaus drink at the public cost, and give orders each to his own people as Jove vouchsafes him power and glory, the fight is so thick about me that I cannot distinguish you severally; come on, therefore, every man unbidden, and think it shame that Patroclus should become meat and morsel for Trojan hounds.
ild.17 Jove, moreover, hid the brightness of their helmets in a thick cloud, for he had borne no grudge against the son of Menoetius while he was still alive and squire to the descendant of Aeacus; therefore he was loth to let him fall a prey to the Dogs of his foes the Trojans, and urged his comrades on to defend him.
ild.17 The Trojans would now have been worsted by the brave Achaeans and driven back to Ilius through their own cowardice, while the Argives, so great was their courage and endurance, would have achieved a triumph even against the will of Jove, if Apollo had not roused Aeneas, in the likeness of Periphas son of Epytus, an attendant who had grown old in the service of Aeneas aged father, and was at all times devoted to him.
ild.17 In his likeness, then, Apollo said, Aeneas", can you not manage, even though heaven be against us, to save high Ilius? I have known men, whose numbers, courage, and self reliance have saved their people in spite of Jove, whereas in this case he would much rather give victory to us than to the Danaans, if you would only fight instead of being so terribly afraid.
ild.17 A god has just come up to me and told me that Jove the supreme disposer will be with us.
ild.17 Such fearful turmoil of men and Horses did Jove on that day ordain round the body of Patroclus.
ild.17 He knew that he was not to sack the city neither with nor without himself, for his mother had often told him this when he had sat alone with her, and she had informed him of the counsels of great Jove.
ild.17 Chromius and Aretus went also with them, and their hearts beat high with hope that they might kill the men and capture the Horses fools that they were, for they were not to return scatheless from their meeting with Automedon, who prayed to father Jove and was forthwith filled with courage and strength abounding.
ild.17 Nevertheless the issue lies on the lap of heaven, I will therefore hurl my spear and leave the rest to Jove.
ild.17 And now the fierce groanful fight again raged about Patroclus, for Minerva came down from heaven and roused its fury by the command of far seeing Jove, who had changed his mind and sent her to encourage the Danaans.
ild.17 As when Jove bends his bright bow in heaven in token to mankind either of war or of the chill storms that stay men from their labour and plague the flocks even so, wrapped in such radiant raiment, did Minerva go in among the host and speak man by man to each.
ild.17 Menelaus answered, Phoenix", my good old friend, may Minerva vouchsafe me strength and keep the darts from off me, for so shall I stand by Patroclus and defend him; his death has gone to my heart, but Hector is as a raging fire and deals his blows without ceasing, for Jove is now granting him a time of triumph.
ild.17 Ajax and Menelaus noted how Jove had turned the scale in favour of the Trojans, and Ajax was first to speak.
ild.17 "Alas," said he, "even a fool may see that father Jove is helping the Trojans.
ild.17 All their weapons strike home; no matter whether it be a brave man or a coward that hurls them, Jove speeds all alike, whereas ours fall each one of them without effect.
ild.17 O father Jove, lift this cloud from over the sons of the Achaeans; make heaven serene, and let us see; if you will that we perish, let us fall at any rate by daylight.
ild.17 Father Jove heard him and had compassion upon his tears.
ild.18 Surely Jove has granted you the prayer you made him, when you lifted up your hands and besought him that the Achaeans might all of them be pent up at their ships, and rue it bitterly in that you were no longer with them.
ild.18 Achilles groaned and answered, Mother", Olympian Jove has indeed vouchsafed me the fulfilment of my prayer, but what boots it to me, seeing that my dear comrade Patroclus has fallen he whom I valued more than all others, and loved as dearly as my own life? I have lost him; aye, and Hector when he had killed him stripped the wondrous armour, so glorious to behold, which the Gods gave to Peleus when they laid you in the couch of a mortal man.
ild.18 And yet so be it, for it is over; I will force my soul into subjection as I needs must; I will go; I will pursue Hector who has slain him whom I loved so dearly, and will then abide my doom when it may please Jove and the other Gods to send it.
ild.18 Even Hercules, the best beloved of Jove even he could not escape the hand of death, but fate and Juno s fierce anger laid him low, as I too shall lie when I am dead if a like doom awaits me.
ild.18 She came secretly without the knowledge of Jove and of the other Gods, for Juno sent her, and when she had got close to him she said, "Up, son of Peleus, mightiest of all mankind; rescue Patroclus about whom this fearful fight is now raging by the ships.
ild.18 Iris answered, "It was Juno the royal spouse of Jove, but the son of Saturn does not know of my coming, nor yet does any other of the immortals who dwell on the snowy summits of Olympus.
ild.18 But Achilles dear to Jove arose, and Minerva flung her tasselled aegis round his strong shoulders; she crowned his head with a halo of Golden cloud from which she kindled a glow of gleaming fire.
ild.18 Have you not had enough of being cooped up behind walls? In the old days the city of Priam was famous the whole world over for its wealth of Gold and Bronze, but our treasures are wasted out of our houses, and much goods have been sold away to Phrygia and fair Meonia, for the hand of Jove has been laid heavily upon us.
ild.18 He laid his murderous hands upon the breast of his comrade, groaning again and again as a bearded Lion when a man who was chasing Deer has robbed him of his young in some dense forest; when the Lion comes back he is furious, and searches dingle and dell to track the hunter if he can find him, for he is mad with rage even so with many a sigh did Achilles speak among the Myrmidons saying, "Alas! vain were the words with which I cheered the hero Menoetius in his own house; I said that I would bring his brave son back again to Opoeis after he had sacked Ilius and taken his share of the spoils but Jove does not give all men their heart s desire.
ild.18 Then Jove said to Juno his sister wife, "So, Queen Juno, you have gained your end, and have roused fleet Achilles.
ild.19 Often have the Achaeans spoken to me of this matter and upbraided me, but it was not I that did it: Jove, and Fate, and Erinys that walks in darkness struck me mad when we were assembled on the day that I took from Achilles the meed that had been awarded to him.
ild.19 What could I do? All things are in the hand of heaven, and Folly, eldest of Jove s daughters, shuts men s eyes to their destruction.
ild.19 Time" was when she fooled Jove himself, who they say is greatest whether of Gods or men; for Juno, Woman though she was, beguiled him on the day when Alcmena was to bring forth mighty Hercules in the fair city of Thebes.
ild.19 "Thus she spoke, and Jove suspected her not, but swore the great oath, to his much ruing thereafter.
ild.19 Then she went to tell Jove the son of Saturn, and said, Father Jove, lord of the lightning I have a word for your ear.
ild.19 "On this Jove was stung to the very quick, and in his rage he caught Folly by the hair, and swore a great oath that never should she again invade starry heaven and Olympus, for she was the bane of all.
ild.19 I was blind, and Jove robbed me of my reason; I will now make atonement, and will add much treasure by way of amends.
ild.19 Thus, then, do I charge you: take some noble young Achaeans with you, and bring from my tents the gifts that I promised yesterday to Achilles, and bring the Women also; furthermore let Talthybius find me a boar from those that are with the host, and make it ready for sacrifice to Jove and to the sun.
ild.19 Fighting is a thing of which men soon surfeit, and when Jove, who is wars steward, weighs the upshot, it may well prove that the straw which our sickles have reaped is far heavier than the grain.
ild.19 The other Achaeans sat where they were all silent and orderly to hear the king, and Agamemnon looked into the vault of heaven and prayed saying, "I call Jove the first and mightiest of all Gods to witness, I call also Earth and Sun and the Erinyes who dwell below and take vengeance on him who shall swear falsely, that I have laid no hand upon the girl Briseis, neither to take her to my bed nor otherwise, but that she has remained in my tents inviolate.
ild.19 Then Achilles also rose and said to the Argives, Father" Jove, of a truth you blind men s eyes and bane them.
ild.19 Surely Jove must have counselled the destruction of many an Argive.
ild.19 Thick as the chill snow flakes shed from the hand of Jove and borne on the keen blasts of the north wind, even so thick did the gleaming helmets, the bossed shields, the strongly plated breastplates, and the ashen spears stream from the ships.
ild.20 Meanwhile Jove from the top of many delled Olympus, bade Themis gather the Gods in council, whereon she went about and called them to the house of Jove.
ild.20 When they reached the house of cloud compelling Jove, they took their seats in the arcades of polished marble which Vulcan with his consummate skill had made for father Jove.
ild.20 In such wise, therefore, did they gather in the house of Jove.
ild.20 There, sitting in the midst of them, he asked what Jove s purpose might be.
ild.20 And Jove answered, "You know my purpose, shaker of earth, and wherefore I have called you hither.
ild.20 Thus spoke Jove and gave the word for war, whereon the Gods took their several sides and went into battle.
ild.20 His spear has already put me to Right from Ida, when he attacked our Cattle and sacked Lyrnessus and Pedasus; Jove indeed saved me in that he vouchsafed me strength to fly, else had the fallen by the hands of Achilles and Minerva, who went before him to protect him and urged him to fall upon the Lelegae and Trojans.
ild.20 Then said King Apollo, son to Jove, "Nay, hero, pray to the ever living Gods, for men say that you were born of Jove s daughter Venus, whereas Achilles is son to a Goddess of inferior rank.
ild.20 Venus is child to Jove, while Thetis is but daughter to the old man of the sea.
ild.20 Thus did the Gods sit apart and form their plans, but neither side was willing to begin battle with the other, and Jove from his seat on high was in command over them all.
ild.20 Have you forgotten how when you were alone I chased you from your herds helter skelter down the slopes of Ida? You did not turn round to look behind you; you took refuge in Lyrnessus, but I attacked the city, and with the help of Minerva and father Jove I sacked it and carried its Women into captivity, though Jove and the other Gods rescued you.
ild.20 "In the beginning Dardanus was the son of Jove, and founded Dardania, for Ilius was not yet stablished on the plain for men to dwell in, and her people still abode on the spurs of many fountained Ida.
ild.20 Erichthonius begat Tros, king of the Trojans, and Tros had three noble sons, Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymede who was comeliest of mortal men; wherefore the Gods carried him off to be Jove s cupbearer, for his beauty s sake, that he might dwell among the immortals.
ild.20 "Such do I declare my blood and lineage, but as for valour, Jove gives it or takes it as he will, for he is lord of all.
ild.20 It is fated, moreover, that he should escape, and that the race of Dardanus, whom Jove loved above all the sons born to him of mortal Women, shall not perish utterly without seed or sign.
ild.20 For now indeed has Jove hated the blood of Priam, while Aeneas shall reign over the Trojans, he and his children s children that shall be born hereafter.
ild.21 NOW when they came to the ford of the full flowing river Xanthus, begotten of immortal Jove, Achilles cut their forces in two: one half he chased over the plain towards the city by the same way that the Achaeans had taken when flying panic stricken on the preceding day with Hector in full triumph; this way did they fly pell mell, and Juno sent down a thick mist in front of them to stay them.
ild.21 Surely father Jove must hate me, that he has given me over to you a second time.
ild.21 You declare yourself sprung from the blood of a broad river, but I am of the seed of mighty Jove.
ild.21 My father is Peleus, son of Aeacus ruler over the many Myrmidons, and Aeacus was the son of Jove.
ild.21 Therefore as Jove is mightier than any river that flows into the sea, so are his children stronger than those of any river whatsoever.
ild.21 Moreover you have a great river hard by if he can be of any use to you, but there is no fighting against Jove the son of Saturn, with whom not even King Achelous can compare, nor the mighty stream of deep flowing Oceanus, from whom all rivers and seas with all springs and deep wells proceed; even Oceanus fears the lightnings of great Jove, and his thunder that comes crashing out of heaven.
ild.21 Achilles answered, "So be it, Scamander, Jove descended; but I will never cease dealing out death among the Trojans, till I have pent them up in their city, and made trial of Hector face to face, that I may learn whether he is to vanquish me, or I him.
ild.21 But the river said to Apollo, "Surely, son of Jove, lord of the Silver bow, you are not obeying the commands of Jove who charged you straitly that you should stand by the Trojans and defend them, till twilight fades, and darkness is over an the earth.
ild.21 Then the son of Peleus lifted up his voice to heaven saying, Father" Jove, is there none of the Gods who will take pity upon me, and save me from the river? I do not care what may happen to me afterwards.
ild.21 Son" of Peleus," said he, "be not so exceeding fearful; we are two Gods, come with Jove s sanction to assist you, I, and Pallas Minerva.
ild.21 Jove heard as he was sitting on Olympus, and laughed for joy when he saw the Gods coming to blows among themselves.
ild.21 As he spoke he struck her on the terrible tasselled aegis so terrible that not even can Jove s lightning pierce it.
ild.21 She then turned her two piercing eyes elsewhere, whereon Jove s daughter Venus took Mars by the hand and led him away groaning all the time, for it was only with great difficulty that he had come to himself again.
ild.21 When Queen Juno saw her, she said to Minerva, "Look, daughter of aegis bearing Jove, unweariable, that vixen Venus is again taking Mars through the crowd out of the battle; go after her at once.
ild.21 Meanwhile King Neptune turned to Apollo saying, Phoebus", why should we keep each other at arm s length? it is not well, now that the others have begun fighting; it will be disgraceful to us if we return to Jove s Bronze floored mansion on Olympus without having fought each other; therefore come on, you are the younger of the two, and I ought not to attack you, for I am older and have had more experience.
ild.21 Idiot, you have no sense, and forget how we two alone of all the Gods fared hardly round about Ilius when we came from Jove s house and worked for Laomedon a whole year at a stated wage and he gave us his orders.
ild.21 Apollo made her no answer, but Jove s august queen was angry and upbraided her bitterly.
ild.21 Jove made you as a Lion among Women, and lets you kill them whenever you choose.
ild.21 Then the slayer of Argus, guide and guardian, said to Leto, Leto", I shall not fight you; it is ill to come to blows with any of Jove s wives.
ild.21 Diana had now reached Jove s Bronze floored mansion on Olympus, and sat herself down with many tears on the knees of her father, while her ambrosial raiment was quivering all about her.
ild.21 Thus did they converse, and meanwhile Phoebus Apollo entered the strong city of Ilius, for he was uneasy lest the wall should not hold out and the Danaans should take the city then and there, before its hour had come; but the rest of the ever living Gods went back, some angry and some triumphant to Olympus, where they took their seats beside Jove lord of the storm cloud, while Achilles still kept on dealing out death alike on the Trojans and on their As when the smoke from some burning city ascends to heaven when the anger of the Gods has kindled it there is then toil for all, and sorrow for not a few even so did Achilles bring toil and sorrow on the Trojans.
ild.21 Life is the same in one and all, and men say that he is but mortal despite the triumph that Jove son of Saturn vouchsafes him.
ild.22 Better fight him at once, and learn to which of us Jove will vouchsafe victory.
ild.22 And Jove answered, "My child, Trito born, take heart.
ild.22 Do what Apollo may as he lies grovelling before his father, aegis bearing Jove, Hector cannot escape us longer.
ild.22 Let us, then, give pledges to one another by our Gods, who are the fittest witnesses and guardians of all covenants; let it be agreed between us that if Jove vouchsafes me the longer stay and I take your life, I am not to treat your dead body in any unseemly fashion, but when I have stripped you of your armour, I am to give up your body to the Achaeans.
ild.22 Hector saw it coming and avoided it; he watched it and crouched down so that it flew over his head and stuck in the ground beyond; Minerva then snatched it up and gave it back to Achilles without Hector s seeing her; Hector thereon said to the son of Peleus, "You have missed your aim, Achilles, peer of the Gods, and Jove has not yet revealed to you the hour of my doom, though you made sure that he had done so.
ild.22 I deemed that the hero Deiphobus was by my side, but he is within the wall, and Minerva has inveigled me; death is now indeed exceedingly near at hand and there is no way out of it for so Jove and his son Apollo the far darter have willed it, though heretofore they have been ever ready to protect me.
ild.22 But Achilles said, speaking to the dead body, "Die; for my part I will accept my fate whensoever Jove and the other Gods see fit to send it.
ild.22 The dust rose from Hector as he was being dragged along, his dark hair flew all abroad, and his head once so comely was laid low on earth, for Jove had now delivered him into the hands of his foes to do him outrage in his own land.
ild.23 As soon as they reached Agamemnon s tent they told the serving men to set a large tripod over the fire in case they might persuade the son of Peleus to wash the clotted gore from this body, but he denied them sternly, and swore it with a solemn oath, saying, "Nay, by King Jove, first and mightiest of all Gods, it is not meet that water should touch my body, till I have laid Patroclus on the flames, have built him a barrow, and shaved my head for so long as I live no such second sorrow shall ever draw nigh me.
ild.23 Thus did he vaunt, but the Dogs came not about the body of Hector, for Jove s daughter Venus kept them off him night and day, and anointed him with ambrosial oil of roses that his flesh might not be torn when Achilles was dragging him about.
ild.23 The mare had been given to Agamemnon by echepolus son of Anchises, that he might not have to follow him to Ilius, but might stay at home and take his ease; for Jove had endowed him with great wealth and he lived in spacious Sicyon.
ild.23 Antilochus"," said Nestor, "you are young, but Jove and Neptune have loved you well, and have made you an excellent Horseman.
ild.23 Ulysses could not throw Ajax, nor Ajax him; Ulysses was too strong for him; but when the Achaeans began to tire of watching them, Ajax said to ulysses, Ulysses", noble son of Laertes, you shall either lift me, or I you, and let Jove settle it between us.
ild.24 All were of this mind save only Juno, Neptune, and Jove s grey eyed daughter, who persisted in the hate which they had ever borne towards Ilius with Priam and his people; for they forgave not the wrong done them by Alexandrus in disdaining the Goddesses who came to him when he was in his Sheepyards, and preferring her who had offered him a wanton to his ruin.
ild.24 Then said Jove, Juno", be not so bitter.
ild.24 Iris went up to her and said, "Rise Thetis; Jove, whose counsels fail not, bids you come to him.
ild.24 Minerva gave up her seat to her, and she sat down by the side of father Jove.
ild.24 Now, therefore, heed what I say, for I come as a messenger from Jove; he says that the Gods are angry with you, and himself more angry than them all, in that you keep Hector at the ships and will not give him up.
ild.24 If Olympian Jove of his own motion thus commands me, let him that brings the ransom bear the body away.
ild.24 The messenger of Jove stood by Priam and spoke softly to him, but fear fell upon him as she did so.
ild.24 I come as a messenger from Jove, who though he be not near, takes thought for you and pities you.
ild.24 You are to have no thought, nor fear of death, for Jove will send the slayer of Argus to escort you.
ild.24 She stood in front of the Horses and said, "Take this, make a drink offering to father Jove, and since you are minded to go to the ships in spite of me, pray that you may come safely back from the hands of your enemies.
ild.24 If all seeing Jove will not send you this messenger, however set upon it you may be, I would not have you go to the ships of the Argives.
ild.24 And Priam answered, Wife", I will do as you desire me; it is well to lift hands in prayer to Jove, if so be he may have mercy upon me.
ild.24 Father" Jove," he said, "that rulest from Ida, most glorious and most great, grant that I may be received kindly and compassionately in the tents of Achilles; and send your swift messenger upon my right hand, the bird of omen which is strongest and most dear to you of all birds, that I may see it with my own eyes and trust it as I go forth to the ships of the Danaans.
ild.24 So did he pray, and Jove the lord of counsel heard his prayer.
ild.24 But Priam and Idaeus as they showed out upon the plain did not escape the ken of all seeing Jove, who looked down upon the old man and pitied him; then he spoke to his son Mercury and said, Mercury", for it is you who are the most disposed to escort men on their way, and to hear those whom you will hear, go, and so conduct Priam to the ships of the Achaeans that no other of the Danaans shall see him nor take note of him until he reach the son of Peleus.
ild.24 The immortals know no care, yet the lot they spin for man is full of sorrow; on the floor of Jove s palace there stand two urns, the one filled with evil gifts, and the other with good ones.
ild.24 He for whom Jove the lord of thunder mixes the gifts he sends, will meet now with good and now with evil fortune; but he to whom Jove sends none but evil gifts will be pointed at by the finger of scorn, the hand of famine will pursue him to the ends of the world, and he will go up and down the face of the earth, respected neither by Gods nor men.
ild.24 My mother, daughter of the old man of the sea, came to me from Jove to bid me deliver it to you.
ild.24 Moreover I know well, O Priam, and you cannot hide it, that some God has brought you to the ships of the Achaeans, for else, no man however strong and in his prime would dare to come to our host; he could neither pass our guard unseen, nor draw the bolt of my gates thus easily; therefore, provoke me no further, lest I sin against the word of Jove, and suffer you not, suppliant though you are, within my tents.
ild.24 Then he called to his servants and ordered them to wash the body and anoint it, but he first took it to a place where Priam should not see it, lest if he did so, he should break out in the bitterness of his grief, and enrage Achilles, who might then kill him and sin against the word of Jove.
ild.24 When they came to the ford of eddying Xanthus, begotten of immortal Jove, Mercury went back to high Olympus, and dawn in robe of saffron began to break over all the land.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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