Lycaon

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 22 Sep 2011 11:04 and updated at 22 Sep 2011 11:04

ILIAD NOUN

ild.02 Ida, men of substance, who drink the limpid waters of the Aesepus, and are of Trojan blood these were led by Pandarus son of Lycaon, whom Apollo had taught to use the bow.
ild.03 First he greaved his legs with greaves of good make and fitted with ancle clasps of Silver; after this he donned the cuirass of his brother Lycaon, and fitted it to his own body; he hung his Silver studded sword of Bronze about his shoulders, and then his mighty shield.
ild.04 Then Minerva took the form of Laodocus, son of Antenor, and went through the ranks of the Trojans to find Pandarus, the redoubtable son of Lycaon.
ild.04 She found him standing among the stalwart heroes who had followed him from the banks of the Aesopus, so she went close up to him and said, "Brave son of Lycaon, will you do as I tell you? If you dare send an arrow at Menelaus you will win honour and thanks from all the Trojans, and especially from prince Alexandrus he would be the first to requite you very handsomely if he could see Menelaus mount his funeral pyre, slain by an arrow from your hand.
ild.05 Now when the son of Lycaon saw him scouring the plain and driving the Trojans pell mell before him, he aimed an arrow and hit the front part of his cuirass near the shoulder: the arrow went right through the metal and pierced the flesh, so that the cuirass was covered with blood.
ild.05 On this the son of Lycaon shouted in triumph, Knights" Trojans, come on; the bravest of the Achaeans is wounded, and he will not hold out much longer if King Apollo was indeed with me when I sped from Lycia hither.
ild.05 When he had found the brave son of Lycaon he said, Pandarus", where is now your bow, your winged arrows, and your renown as an archer, in respect of which no man here can rival you nor is there any in Lycia that can beat you? Lift then your hands to Jove and send an arrow at this fellow who is going so masterfully about, and has done such deadly work among the Trojans.
ild.05 And the son of Lycaon answered, Aeneas", I take him for none other than the son of Tydeus.
ild.05 In my father s stables there are Eleven excellent Chariots, fresh from the builder, quite new, with cloths spread over them; and by each of them there stand a pair of Horses, champing barley and rye; my old father Lycaon urged me again and again when I was at home and on the point of starting, to take Chariots and Horses with me that I might lead the Trojans in battle, but I would not listen to him; it would have been much better if I had done so, but I was thinking about the Horses, which had been used to eat their fill, and I was afraid that in such a great gathering of men they might be ill fed, so I left them at home and came on foot to Ilius armed only with my bow and arrows.
ild.05 replied the son of Lycaon, "take the reins and drive; if we have to fly before the son of Tydeus the Horses will go better for their own driver.
ild.05 Sthenelus, son of Capaneus, saw them coming and said to Diomed, "Diomed, son of Tydeus, man after my own heart, I see two heroes speeding towards you, both of them men of might the one a skilful archer, Pandarus son of Lycaon, the other, Aeneas, whose sire is Anchises, while his mother is Venus.
ild.05 Thus did they converse, but the other two had now driven close up to them, and the son of Lycaon spoke first.
ild.05 Thereon the son of Lycaon shouted out and said, "You are hit clean through the belly; you will not stand out for long, and the glory of the fight is mine.
ild.20 Meanwhile Apollo set Aeneas on to attack the son of Peleus, and put courage into his heart, speaking with the voice of Lycaon son of Priam.
ild.21 There he found Lycaon, son of Priam seed of Dardanus, as he was escaping out of the water; he it was whom he had once taken prisoner when he was in his father s vineyard, having set upon him by night, as he was cutting young shoots from a wild fig tree to make the wicker sides of a Chariot.
ild.21 But Lycaon came up to him dazed and trying hard to embrace his knees, for he would fain live, not die.
ild.21 Achilles thrust at him with his spear, meaning to kill him, but Lycaon ran crouching up to him and caught his knees, whereby the spear passed over his back, and stuck in the ground, hungering though it was for blood.
ild.21 Thus did he speak, and Lycaon s heart sank within him.
ild.21 There shall the fishes feed on the fat of Lycaon as they dart under the dark ripple of the waters so perish all of you till we reach the citadel of strong Ilius you in flight, and I following after to destroy you.
ild.22 Monster that he is; would indeed that the Gods loved him no better than I do, for so, Dogs and Vultures would soon devour him as he lay stretched on earth, and a load of grief would be lifted from my heart, for many a brave son has he reft from me, either by killing them or selling them away in the islands that are beyond the sea: even now I miss two sons from among the Trojans who have thronged within the city, Lycaon and Polydorus, whom Laothoe peeress among Women bore me.
ild.23 Eueneus son of jason had given it to Patroclus in ransom of Priam s son Lycaon, and Achilles now offered it as a prize in honour of his comrade to him who should be the swiftest runner.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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