Scaean

Created by Sreeja Jijith at 22 Sep 2011 12:57 and updated at 22 Sep 2011 12:57

ILIAD NOUN

ild.03 And straightway they were at the Scaean gates.
ild.03 The two sages, Ucalegon and Antenor, elders of the people, were seated by the Scaean gates, with Priam, Panthous, Thymoetes, Lampus, Clytius, and Hiketaon of the race of Mars.
ild.03 He mounted the Chariot, gathered the reins in his hand, and Antenor took his seat beside him; they then drove through the Scaean gates on to the plain.
ild.06 Now when Hector reached the Scaean gates and the oak tree, the wives and daughters of the Trojans came running towards him to ask after their sons, brothers, kinsmen, and husbands: he told them to set about praying to the gods, and many were made sorrowful as they heard him.
ild.06 "Holy Minerva," she cried, "protectress of our city, mighty Goddess, break the spear of Diomed and lay him low before the Scaean gates.
ild.06 When he had gone through the city and had reached the Scaean gates through which he would go out on to the plain, his wife came running towards him, Andromache, daughter of great Eetion who ruled in Thebe under the wooded slopes of Mt.
ild.09 So long as I fought the Achaeans Hector suffered not the battle range far from the city walls; he would come to the Scaean gates and to the oak tree, but no further.
ild.11 They flew on by the tomb of old Ilus, son of Dardanus, in the middle of the plain, and past the place of the wild fig tree making always for the city the son of Atreus still shouting, and with hands all bedrabbled in gore; but when they had reached the Scaean gates and the oak tree, there they halted and waited for the others to come up.
ild.16 Meanwhile Hector was waiting with his Horses inside the Scaean gates, in doubt whether to drive out again and go on fighting, or to call the army inside the gates.
ild.18 All day long they fought by the Scaean gates and would have taken the city there and then, had not Apollo vouchsafed glory to Hector and slain the valiant son of Menoetius after he had done the Trojans much evil.
ild.22 But stern fate bade Hector stay where he was before Ilius and the Scaean gates.
ild.22 Hector with his dying breath then said, "I know you what you are, and was sure that I should not move you, for your heart is hard as iron; look to it that I bring not heaven s anger upon you on the day when Paris and Phoebus Apollo, valiant though you be, shall slay you at the Scaean gates.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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