Vulcan

Created by Sreeja Jijith at 22 Sep 2011 13:30 and updated at 22 Sep 2011 13:30

ILIAD NOUN

ild.01 But the heavenly beings were disquieted throughout the house of Jove, till the cunning workman Vulcan began to try and pacify his mother Juno.
ild.01 Then Vulcan drew sweet nectar from the mixing bowl, and served it round among the Gods, going from left to right; and the blessed Gods laughed out a loud applause as they saw him ing bustling about the heavenly mansion.
ild.01 But when the sun s glorious light had faded, they went home to bed, each in his own abode, which lame Vulcan with his consummate skill had fashioned for them.
ild.02 This was the work of Vulcan, who gave it to Jove the son of Saturn.
ild.05 Now there was a certain rich and honourable man among the Trojans, priest of Vulcan, and his name was Dares.
ild.05 Idaeus did not dare to bestride his brother s body, but sprang from the Chariot and took to flight, or he would have shared his brother s fate; whereon Vulcan saved him by wrapping him in a cloud of darkness, that his old father might not be utterly overwhelmed with grief; but the son of Tydeus drove off with the Horses, and bade his followers take them to the ships.
ild.08 the cuirass which Vulcan made him.
ild.14 She went, therefore, to the room which her son Vulcan had made her, and the doors of which he had cunningly fastened by means of a secret key so that no other God could open them.
ild.14 Close Jove s keen eyes for me in slumber while I hold him clasped in my embrace, and I will give you a beautiful golden seat, that can never fall to pieces; my clubfooted son Vulcan shall make it for you, and he shall give it a footstool for you to rest your fair feet upon when you are at table.
ild.14 "Most dread son of Saturn," she exclaimed, "what are you talking about? Would you have us enjoy one another here on the top of Mount Ida, where everything can be seen? What if one of the ever living Gods should see us sleeping together, and tell the others? It would be such a scandal that when I had risen from your embraces I could never show myself inside your house again; but if you are so minded, there is a room which your son Vulcan has made me, and he has given it good strong doors; if you would so have it, let us go thither and lie down.
ild.15 Now, however, I will give way in spite of my displeasure; furthermore let me tell you, and I mean what I say if contrary to the desire of myself, Minerva driver of the spoil, Juno, Mercury, and King Vulcan, Jove spares steep Ilius, and will not let the Achaeans have the great triumph of sacking it, let him understand that he will incur our implacable resentment.
ild.15 He bore aloft the terrible aegis with its shaggy fringe, which Vulcan the smith had given Jove to strike terror into the hearts of men.
ild.18 Full well I know that his vaunt shall not be lasting, for his end is close at hand; go not, however, into the press of battle till you see me return hither; to morrow at break of day I shall be here, and will bring you goodly armour from King Vulcan.
ild.18 Tell him everything; as for me, I will go to the cunning workman Vulcan on high Olympus, and ask him to provide my son with a suit of splendid armour.
ild.18 My mother forbade me to arm till I should see her come, for she promised to bring me goodly armour from Vulcan; I know no man whose arms I can put on, save only the shield of Ajax son of Telamon, and he surely must be fighting in the front rank and wielding his spear about the body of dead Patroclus.
ild.18 Meanwhile Thetis came to the house of Vulcan, imperishable, star bespangled, fairest of the abodes in heaven, a house of Bronze wrought by the lame God s own hands.
ild.18 Then she called Vulcan and said, Vulcan", come here, Thetis wants you"; and the far famed lame God answered, "Then it is indeed an august and honoured Goddess who has come here; she it was that took care of me when I was suffering from the heavy fall which I had through my cruel mother s anger for she would have got rid of me because I was lame.
ild.18 Thetis wept and answered, Vulcan", is there another Goddess in Olympus whom the son of Saturn has been pleased to try with so much affliction as he has me? Me alone of the marine Goddesses did he make subject to a mortal husband, Peleus son of Aeacus, and sorely against my will did I submit to the embraces of one who was but mortal, and who now stays at home worn out with age.
ild.18 And Vulcan answered, "Take heart, and be no more disquieted about this matter; would that I could hide him from death s sight when his hour is come, so surely as I can find him armour that shall amaze the eyes of all who behold it.
ild.18 Twenty bellows blew upon the melting pots, and they blew blasts of every kind, some fierce to help him when he had need of them, and others less strong as Vulcan willed it in the course of his work.
ild.18 Lastly, when the famed lame God had made all the armour, he took it and set it before the mother of Achilles; whereon she darted like a falcon from the snowy summits of Olympus and bore away the gleaming armour from the house of Vulcan.
ild.19 Many also of his followers were weeping round him, but when the goddess came among them she clasped his hand in her own, saying, "My son, grieve as we may we must let this man lie, for it is by heaven s will that he has fallen; now, therefore, accept from Vulcan this rich and goodly armour, which no man has ever yet borne upon his shoulders.
ild.19 Thus, then, full of fury against the Trojans, did he don the gift of the God, the armour that Vulcan had made him.
ild.19 He lifted the redoubtable helmet, and set it upon his head, from whence it shone like a star, and the Golden plumes which Vulcan had set thick about the ridge of the helmet, waved all around it.
ild.20 When they reached the house of cloud compelling Jove, they took their seats in the arcades of polished marble which Vulcan with his consummate skill had made for father Jove.
ild.20 Juno, Pallas Minerva, earth encircling Neptune, Mercury bringer of good luck and excellent in all cunning all these joined the host that came from the ships; with them also came Vulcan in all his glory, limping, but yet with his thin legs plying lustily under him.
ild.20 Apollo with his arrows took his stand to face King Neptune, while Minerva took hers against the God of war; the archer goddess Diana with her Golden arrows, sister of far darting Apollo, stood to face Juno; Mercury the lusty bringer of good luck faced Leto, while the mighty eddying river whom men can Scamander, but Gods Xanthus, matched himself against Vulcan.
ild.21 The dark waters of the river stood upright and would have overwhelmed the son of Peleus, but Juno, trembling lest Achilles should be swept away in the mighty torrent, lifted her voice on high and called out to Vulcan her son.
ild.21 On this Vulcan kindled a fierce fire, which broke out first upon the plain and burned the many dead whom Achilles had killed and whose bodies were lying about in great numbers; by this means the plain was dried and the flood stayed.
ild.21 The eels and fishes that go darting about everywhere in the water, these, too, were sorely harassed by the flames that cunning Vulcan had kindled, and the river himself was scalded, so that he spoke saying, Vulcan", there is no God can hold his own against you.
ild.21 He could flow no longer but stayed his stream, so afflicted was he by the blasts of fire which cunning Vulcan had raised.
ild.21 As soon as Juno heard this she said to her son Vulcan, Son" Vulcan, hold now your flames; we ought not to use such violence against a God for the sake of mortals.
ild.21 When she had thus spoken Vulcan quenched his flames, and the river went back once more into his own fair bed.
ild.22 The thick tresses of Gold wi which Vulcan had crested the helmet floated round it, and as the evening star that shines brighter than all others through the stillness of night, even such was the gleam of the spear which Achilles poised in his right hand, fraught with the death of noble Hector.
ild.23 Many a goodly ox, with many a Sheep and bleating Goat did they butcher and cut up; many a tusked boar moreover, fat and well fed, did they singe and set to roast in the flames of Vulcan; and rivulets of blood flowed all round the place where the body was lying.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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