Polyphemus

Created by Jijith Nadumuri at 20 Sep 2011 14:55 and updated at 20 Sep 2011 14:55

ODYSSEY NOUN

ody.01 And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can I forget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, nor more liberal in his offerings to the immortal Gods that live in heaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious with Ulysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of the Cyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughter to the sea king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulysses outright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home. Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him to return; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mind he can hardly stand out against us."
ody.09 What ails you, Polyphemus, said they, that you make such a noise, breaking the stillness of the night, and preventing us from being able to sleep? Surely no man is carrying off your Sheep? Surely no man is trying to kill you either by fraud or by force?
ody.09 "But Polyphemus shouted to them from inside the cave, Noman is killing me by fraud! Noman is killing me by force!
ody.09 "Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came, but when the child of morning, rosy fingered Dawn, appeared, the male Sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating about the pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting; but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all the Sheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find out that the men were underneath their bellies. As the ram was going out, last of all, heavy with its fleece and with the weight of my crafty self; Polyphemus laid hold of it and said:
ody.10 "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how they had been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savage ogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there was nothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into Two companies and set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while I took command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, and the lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his Twenty Two men, and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.

Arise Greece! from thy silent sleep, 2000 years long it is! Forget not, thy ancient culture, beautiful and marvelous it is!

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